Speakers/Chautauqua Catalog

Name Mr. William W. Dunmire
Email bdunmire@unm.edu
Phone 505/867-3474
Address 12 Camino a las Estrellas
Placitas, NM  87043
US
Biographical Info With degrees in wildlife management and zoology from the University of California, Berkeley, Bill Dunmire enjoyed a 28-year career with the National Park Service. He was Chief of Interpretation for the entire service in the mid-1970s. He also served as Superintendent of Carlsbad Caverns, NM, and Guadalupe Mountains, Texas, National Parks in 1985, then spent seven years as a field biologist in New Mexico for the Nature Conservancy. Now, he is a writer/lecturer and photographer, traveling widely to research his material.
Program Title OUR GIFT FROM SPAIN: How Mediterranean Plants and Foods Came to New Mexico
 
Program Description This slide-illustrated talk relates the story of how Old World cultivated plants and foods made their way from pre-Colombian Spain to the colonial frontier of New Mexico and the greater Southwest. It focuses on the positive contributions of the Spanish colonizers and missionaries and tells of how Puebloans and other native peoples in New Mexico integrated some of the crops and foods into their own cultures.
Series New Mexico History and Cultures; Conversations With the World
Chautauqua Program Application (Booking) Click here to fill out a funding application for this program »
Program Title NATIVE PEOPLE OF NORTH AMERICA: What They Grew and Gathered
 
Program Description This slide-illustrated talk relates the connections between plants and native people of New Mexico, especially Pueblo and Navajo Indians. It deals with the earliest farming in America but also emphasizes the importance of a host of common wild plants that were gathered to supplement diets; furnish medicine; make fabric dye and pottery paint; provide fiber for baskets, blankets and twine; and many other uses.
Series New Mexico History and Cultures
Chautauqua Program Application (Booking) Click here to fill out a funding application for this program »
Program Title NEW MEXICO'S LIVING LANDSCAPES
 
Program Description New Mexico is third among states of greatest natural diversity, exceeded only by Texas and California. This program will answer such questions as "Why does the countryside around Las Cruces look so different from that surrounding Albuquerque, Taos, or Farmington?" It will provide an understanding of how and why our countrysides differ so greatly. The slide-illustrated talk takes you through New Mexico's six ecoregions (Chihuahuan Desert bordering Mexico; the Great Basin Desert; the Great Plains Grassland; the alpine Mountain Forests of the Sangre de Cristo, Sandia, and Sacramento Mountains; and the PiƱon-Juniper Woodlands) and along some of our magnificent State and National Scenic Byways, from grasslands to mountains to deserts, focusing on the most interesting landscape features and the plants and wildlife that occur there.
Series New Mexico History and Cultures; Sustaining Community
Chautauqua Program Application (Booking) Click here to fill out a funding application for this program »
Program Title NEW MEXICO'S SPANISH LIVESTOCK HERITAGE
 
Program Description The program will present on the several species of domestic livestock and then describe how Puebloans and Navajos slowly adopted horses, donkeys, sheep, goats, cattle, pigs, and chickens after their arrival with the Spanish colonists in 1598. It will also discuss how quickly the Plains Indians learned to steal and ride horses, and how horses became central to their economy. The talk will describe how sheep became New Mexico's most important economic animal and will cover the arrival of cattlemen from Texas on the eastern plains and the rising economic importance of cattle in our state, including how cattle replaced the historic herds of bison. Dunmire's program will be illustrated with historic black and white photographs from the 1880s through the 1930s along with contemporary slides of grazing and the effects of overgrazing as well as people involved in ranching activities today. Bill's talk will be based upon his book, New Mexico's Spanish Livestock Heritage: Four Centuries of Animals, Land, and People published by UNM Press.
Series New Mexico History and Cultures; Sustaining Community
Chautauqua Program Application (Booking) Click here to fill out a funding application for this program »
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who we are,
who we were
and who we aspire to be.

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