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Your search yielded 138 results:

Mr. Dan Arterburn
MUSIC MOSEY'S WEST

Series: Art, Music and Dance; New Mexico History and Cultures

The movement west from the beginning brought music along with it, but instruments were not always available to accompany the songs. Dulcimer Dan displays and discusses a wide range of traditional, hand-crafted instruments and performs music of the westward movement. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mrs. Paulette Atencio
TRADITIONAL STORIES FROM NORTHERN NEW MEXICO

Series: Writers, Storytellers and Poets; New Mexico History and Cultures

Atencio delights audiences with cuentos (stories) learned growing up in Peñasco, NM and a lifetime traveling northern and central New Mexico. Stories can be told in English or Spanish, to adults or children. The stories focus on traditions, what it means to be of Hispanic descent, and universal humor and lessons. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Judith Avila
CHESTER NEZ: World War II Navajo Code Talker

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Conversations With the World

Although 420 Navajo code talkers served in the Marines during World War II, none had written memoirs until Nez's 2012 autobiography Code Talker. Chester Nez (1921-2014) was one of the original 29 code talkers, men who developed the only unbroken code in modern warfare and took it into battle against the Japanese. His life demonstrated how challenges enhance strength and how diversity augments the strength of a nation. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Nancy Bartlit
SILENT VOICES OF WORLD WAR II: When Sons of the Land of Enchantment Met Sons of the Land of the Rising Sun

Series: Conversations With the World; New Mexico History and Cultures

Imagine World War II without the atomic bomb developed at Los Alamos. What if no rapid Navajo code was used which the Japanese could not break? Or, if the New Mexico National Guardsmen had no role in the Philippines? Why were Japanese American civilians interned in Santa Fe? My talk illustrates cultural differences and ironies in wartime, behind barbed wire or at the end of a gun. The talk can be modified for the general audience or for teens to cover any or all of the four topics required for teaching to meet the 9th grade New Mexico history standard: namely, the Manhattan Project, Navajo Code Talkers, NM National Guardsmen, and Santa Fe Camp Internees. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Stefanie Beninato, JD PhD
LAND GRANTS AND WATER RIGHTS: Fighting Words in the Twenty-First Century?

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Land grants and water rights have been an integral part of New Mexico's history. The subject of intense debates, long and arduous discussions and disagreements, court rulings and legislation, land grant and acequia rights remain an ongoing issue in New Mexico today. This presentation addresses the cultural, social, economic and political history as well as jurisprudence. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Stefanie Beninato, JD PhD
POPÉ AND NARANJO: Leadership in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Was Popé the leader of the Pueblo Revolt? Were there other leaders? Until recently, with few exceptions, historians left this question unstudied. Let's examine the documents within a cooperative model of Pueblo leadership so we can appreciate this event and its enormous consequences on the cultural landscape of New Mexico. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Stefanie Beninato, JD PhD
THE INDIAN NEW DEAL IN THE SOUTHWEST

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

The Indian New Deal marked a major change in relations between Native Americans and whites. Policy went from assimilation and integration to cultural preservation and self-government. John Collier, Indian commissioner, who created the policy, took the reforms from the Mexican Revolution and applied them to Native American groups here. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Stefanie Beninato, JD PhD
"THE POLITICS OF REBELLION": The Free Speech Movement and the Counter-Culture

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Sustaining Community

This NMHC presentation centers on the Free Speech Movement’s effects on the counterculture. The Free Speech Movement (FSM), an early outgrowth of the civil rights movement, was seminal in setting up the environment of the 1960s that allowed students who were dissatisfied with society to make changes. Although it might have been an unintended consequence, it unlocked the possibility of new social structures and politicized life-style choices. This presentation explores the history of the FSM and some of the long-lasting contributions of the counter-culture: recycling, sustainability, organic farming, alternative energy sources, and an acceptance of alternative life-styles This topic is relevant both historically and currently to New Mexico, the site of numerous communes in the 1960s. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Ann Beyke
MARGARET SANGER: The Woman Rebel
Chautauqua as Margaret Sanger

Series: American Icons; Conversations With the World

In the early 1900's, Margaret Sanger was jailed for opening a clinic that provided information on birth control. During her colorful and oftentimes controversial life, Sanger dedicated herself to promoting contraception as a means for women to gain control of their lives. She was instrumental in the discovery of The Pill, which changed the lives of millions of women worldwide. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Ann Beyke
THE WONDER OF NATURE: Rachel Carson
Chautauqua as Rachel Carson

Series: Conversations With the World

Rachel Carson was a marine biologist when few women dared even tread the water. Her lifelong love of nature and science led to research on how uncontrolled chemical use devastated wildlife and food sources. Her best selling book on the topic, Silent Spring, detailed this devastation and led to the eventual ban on the use of DDT in the United States. This program brings to life one of the most influential women in modern history. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Ann Beyke
ROSIE THE RIVETER: Working for Victory on the Home Front
Chautauqua as Rosie the Riveter

Series: American Icons

The poster of Rosie the Riveter might be familiar to you – but just who is that woman in the red polka-dotted bandana? Rosie was a symbol for the more than six million women who joined the work force during World War II - women who riveted together planes, built bombs, lead symphony orchestras, were welders and machinists, police officers and cab drivers. Rosie personified the young mothers who left their homes and farms and traveled to work in the factories when many of the men in America had enlisted in the military to help defend the country. For many women, it was the first time in their lives they had earned a salary. They developed a camaraderie with their co-workers and were proud of their efforts as they worked for victory on the home front. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Deborah Blanche
O'KEEFFE: Close Up and Faraway
Chautauqua as Georgia O'Keeffe

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; American Icons; Art, Music and Dance

"Who am I? What do I have to say? How can I best express it?" The artist Georgia O'Keeffe (1887-1986) continually probed into these essential human questions. Prominent in the male-dominated art world of New York City, O’Keeffe took a residence in New Mexico in the 1930’s. During the seven decades of her career she challenged herself with “what to say” that was uniquely her own. Her colors might be bright and vivid, or black and white. Her subjects were landscapes, buildings, flowers, bones, shells, leaves, trees, cityscapes, skulls, skies, clouds, doors, and various combinations and abstractions of them. All were rendered into her own stylized images in a wide variety of mediums, while she honed an image of herself as private, independent, solitary, mysterious. This Chautauqua’s intentional suspension of time and space invites the audience to have its own O’Keeffe experience through her photographs, her words, and the language that she preferred and perfected – her art. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Deborah Blanche
JEANETTE RANKIN (1880-1973): The Disarming Dissenter
Chautauqua as Jeanette Rankin

Series: Conversations With the World

Jeannette Rankin was the first woman elected to the United States Congress. A Westerner from Montana, she was a leader in the struggle for women's suffrage, peace and social justice. Miss Rankin was a builder of bridges between classes, genders and diverse ideas. With story, song and dramatization, highlights of her life from 1917-1968 unfold. She answers questions, delights, provokes and challenges us to re-examine and re-affirm our common humanity. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Deborah Blanche
LAURA GILPIN, PHOTOGRAPHER (1891-1979)
Chautauqua as Laura Gilpin

Series: Art, Music and Dance

She packed in her equipment on horseback, made studio portraits and captured Shiprock from every possible angle. She built both photographic and personal bridges between Native people of the Southwest and the general public. Meet Miss Gilpin in 1954, then a well-known resident of Santa Fe. She narrates a slide show which includes images from her book "The Enduring Navajo." She answers questions and tells numerous behind-the-camera stories about her life and work. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Deborah Blanche
LA NINA: Nina Otero-Warren
Chautauqua as Nina Otero-Warren

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Born into the families Luna and Otero, Nina moved to Santa Fe as a teenager. La Nina was superintendent of schools. She was also an organizer of Santa Fe Fiesta, Indian Market, and Spanish Colonial Arts. She worked to get New Mexico women the right to vote, then ran for U.S. Congress in 1922. Meet her in 1951 for her 70th birthday as she reminisces, confides, answers and disclaims -- and even tells some stories from her book, "Old Spain in our Southwest." | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Irene Blea
COMMERCE AND CULTURE ON THE SANTA FE TRAIL

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Explore the Santa Fe trail with the Dr. Irene Blea. Meet fascinating animals, flower, fauna, places and the many cultures from which travelers originated. Learn Spanish and Mexican international trade laws which bring new meaning to concepts like contraband, trespassing, undocumented workers, immigrants. Lives changed because of the Mexican American War, which ended in 1848. US military takeover resulted in the New Mexico Territory, which lead to different modes of survival, art, literature, medical treatments, and land surveying. By the 1850s, stagecoaches, the US mail and finally the railroad brought a slow end of the trail and negatively impacted commerphce in Santa Fe, one of America's oldest settlements. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Irene Blea
THE WOMEN AND MEN OF FORT UNION

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

This multicultural perspective of Native Americans, Hispanics and "newcomers" in the mid to late 1800s offers a quick overview of the establishment of Fort Union on the Santa Fe Trail, the regional and imported materials used in its construction and its daily function. The primary focus of the presentation is on the little known facts concerning soldiers, officer's wives, laundresses, maids, servants and prostitutes. The program ends with an opportunity for the audience to discuss and ask questions leading to a critical analysis of the period and its implications today. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Irene Blea
DOÑA TULES: Lady Gambler of Santa Fe
Chautauqua as Doña Tules

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Her profession strikes sharply at the heart of American ethics, but her life reveals a unique personality, unlikely relationships, and wealth used to assist her community, and gain the admiration of the Catholic Church. Doña Tules' contribution to New Mexico history, the speculation and controversy about her, holds audience interest, increases knowledge and stimulates the imagination. She was well established and affluent when the US military and when American wagon trains arrived in Santa Fe. Americans were intrigued by her prominence, and have debated the contradictions of her life as the highly respected professional lady gambler, who could deal the monte cards and win like no other, and have the most lavish funeral of the era. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Phil Bock
DEAN ROBB: From Wall Street to UNM

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Bock's lecture on J. Donald Robb tells of Robb’s life as an eminent Wall Street lawyer and his decision in 1941 to abandon that career and come to UNM to follow his dream of composing musical works in many genres. As Dean of Fine Arts, Robb was able to hire outstanding people (Walter Keller, Jane Snow, Kurt Fredrick, Donald McRae). He built the music department, founded the UNM Symphony, and planned the Center for the Arts. Robb spent many years traveling the Hispanic villages of the state, recording songs and rituals. The resulting archive of more than 3000 items is preserved at UNM where an annual composers symposium makes use of these materials for academic and creative purposes. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Baldwin Burr
ERNIE PYLE: Bringing the World to America’s Doorstep
Chautauqua as Ernie Pyle

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Conversations With the World

Through his daily syndicated newspaper columns, Ernie Pyle documented characters and events he encountered as a roving reporter. Later, as a war correspondent during World War II, Ernie’s columns became a series of GI “letters home” that were greatly appreciated by the soldiers fighting and dying on the world’s battlefronts. Ernie often was able to describe events and conditions that would be censored in the GIs own letters. Ernie was killed by a sniper on Ie Shima Island, near Okinawa, on April 18, 1945. This performance takes place during the last 45 minutes of Ernie’s life. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Sherri Burr
INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS IN A POST-9/11 WORLD

Series: Conversations With the World

International relations requires nations to negotiate, arbitrate, or deploy political, economic, cultural and diplomatic resources to resolve their disputes before relying on military means. In a post-9/11 world, nations launch missiles first, ask questions later. Burr uses classic military strategists like Sun Tzu and Von Clausewitz to illustrate how an attack-first strategy destabilizes the world community. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Sherri Burr
RACE AND RACISM IN THE NEW MILLENNIUM: The Economic Impact of Unconscious Bias

Series: Sustaining Community; Conversations With the World

As the domestic and international economy evolves, so too has the discriminatory impact of unconscious bias. Burr uses studies on shopping for cars and mortgages, participating in music competitions, and searching for jobs using phantom resumes to show that while the law has eliminated conscious discrimination against African-Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans and others, these groups continue to be harmed at a more insidious, unconscious level. The surprising revelation is that group members sometimes discriminate against each other. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Leslie Joy Coleman
CALAMITY JANE TALKS TO TOURISTS
Chautauqua as Martha Cannary, aka Calamity Jane

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; American Icons

Martha Cannary, aka Calamity Jane was a well-known and significant historical figure who came to fame (or infamy) during the transition from the 'old west' to a more civilized time. She deeply resented the constraints that society placed on women. "Men had the power and they wanted control, but I wanted to control myself..." Judgmental writers have enjoyed casting stones, describing her as a drunken harridan, a disgrace to womankind. Defenders cite her kindness and maintain she managed to stay sober for periods of time when volunteering her services as an unpaid nurse. Even her most severe critics credit her with caring for miners quarantined during a Deadwood smallpox epidemic and for children or adults stricken with diphtheria, mountain fever and other diseases. Calamity was a product of the wild and wooly west. She was not immoral; but unmoral. With her upbringing, how could she be anything but unmoral. Only the old days could have produced her. She belonged to a time and a class that was fast disappearing. Calamity had nearly all the rough virtues of the old West as well as many of the vices. She was one of the frontier types and she had all the merits and most of their faults. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Steve Cormier
MUSIC FROM THE RANCH AND OPEN RANGE

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Writers, Storytellers and Poets; Art, Music and Dance

Cowboy music has evolved from the open range and ranch employees who worked and rode after cattle during the late 19th and early to mid 20th century. These include songs written by ranch hands about horses, cattle and lost love. Others add death and the devil to the story. But all have in common the expression of what ranch and farm work was like during this time. Steve Cormier performs these and also songs he has written, reflecting his years as a ranch and farm hand. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Don Criss
GEORGE WASHINGTON: The Young Man
Chautauqua as George Washington

Series: American Icons

This lively, interactive presentation is designed for the young (K-3) and also the young at heart. George Washington led a fascinating life as a young man: he surveyed the Shenandoah Valley, lost battles in the French and Indian War, and served alongside the British Army under General Braddock. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Don Criss
JOHN CHAPMAN (JOHNNY APPLESEED): Beloved Eccentric
Chautauqua as John Chapman (Johnny Appleseed)

Series: American Icons

John Chapman was a Swedenborgian missionary and a truly eccentric American hero. He respected all forms of life, covered thousands of square miles with apple orchards, and talked with settlers and the spirits and angels that were a part of his strong faith. Johnny's interactive nature stories are a delight to children (K-3) and anyone who is young at heart. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Brenda Dabney
NEW MEXICO'S AFRICAN-AMERICAN LEGACY: VISIBLE, VITAL, VALUABLE

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

This is a presentation on the African-American presence in New Mexico from 1870-1930. This talk revolves around four themes: original families, social organizations, entrepreneurship and patterns of segregation and integration. The presentation and discussion are enhanced by oral histories as told by descendants of early African-American settlers. Also included are photographs, documents and books. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

M. Ronald and Laia Dans
THE CONQUISTADOR CONQUERED: The Epic Journey of Estevanico and Cabeza de Baca

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

The play is based on Cabeza de Vaca's own autobiography. Shipwrecked in Florida, suffering as slaves of native tribes, both of them became shamans. After walking 3,000 miles barefoot, Cabeza de Baca rejoined the world of the Spaniards and became a defender of the native populations of the New World. Estevanico, a black Moorish slave, became a scout for Coronado, and was the first "white" man to enter New Mexico (Hawiku). This play gives another point of view completely opposite to the black legend of la Conquista. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

M. Ronald and Laia Dans
LADY BLUE'S DREAMS

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Lady Blue was a XVII century mystic, visionary nun who bi-located from Agreda, Spain to New Mexico and the Southwest without leaving her cloistered convent. She appeared to the Natives and communicated without words. Both were fascinated by the other. A prolific writer, geographer, and advisor of King Phillip IV, she was twice confronted by the Inquisition. Her myth connects to the Virgin of Guadalupe, Teresa de Avila and Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz. Historians and scholars continue studying Lady Blue for her role in the building of Spanish New Mexico. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Mary Diecker
IT'S FUN, IT'S HISTORY, IT'S NEW MEXICO!

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

It's fun! Laugh a little and learn a lot about our beautiful state. It's history! It's good guys, bad guys, ladies and those "not so" ladies. It's New Mexico! It's the state stuff (state cookie, fossil, song, butterfly, bird) and so much more. It's the people, places and things of the Land of Enchantment! | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Mary Diecker
STRANGE BUT TRUE TALES OF NEW MEXICO

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

New Mexico is a vast and varied land blessed with a fascinating history, diverse people, and rich cultures. Storytelling has long been a tradition in the Land of Enchantment, helping provide a link between those people and their cultures and conveying the lessons and stories of New Mexico's past. This presentation is a collection of 'strange but true' stories -- some humorous, some poignant -- that illuminate the state's history. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Mary Diecker
THE WHITE HAT GUYS AND THE BLACK HAT GUYS: Some Colorful New Mexico Characters

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

New Mexico, in the late 1800s, was a magnet for outlaws, with its vast areas over which they could roam and its mountains and canyons providing easily accessible hideouts. Trying to contain this lawlessness were the lawmen who rode a land as big as the sky that covered it. Along with the men, there were hardworking women, but there were also scarlet ladies--dance hall girls and ladies of the evening. Later, Hollywood invented a way of identifying which side of the law an individual stood on. In movies about the Old West when a man rides a golden horse, wears a spotless shirt, clean boots and a white hat, there can be no doubt--he is the good guy. Then, through the batwing doors of the saloon strolls a character with a stained vest, scrubby beard, the stub of a cigar tucked into the corner of his mouth, wearing a black hat. We know immediately we are gazing at the bad guy. The White Hat Guys and The Black Hat Guys takes a look at some of the Land of Enchantment's colorful Wild West characters. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Bob Diven
JOHN SINGER SARGENT: Portrait of Madame X
Chautauqua as John Singer Sargent

Series: Art, Music and Dance; American Icons

A play written and performed by Bob Diven. A young John Sargent obsessively pursued a Parisian beauty to paint her portrait. The resulting "Portrait of Madame X" ignited a scandal, becoming Sargent's most famous work and his deepest wound. It is now 1916 as this most famous Victorian painter dramatically reveals his story while sketching, singing and playing the piano. This presentation has certain performance space requirements. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Stephen Dixon
TRAPPING AND TREKKING WITH JAMES OHIO PATTIE
Chautauqua as James Ohio Pattie

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; American Icons

Come along with James Ohio Pattie as he encounters the native plants, animals and peoples of New Mexico. Endure the hardships and unforeseen dangers while traveling through the prairies, deserts, mountains and valleys. View the world through the wide eyes of a mountain man whose words paint pictures in the minds of those who huddle around his campfire. Feel the warmth of his fire as chills run down your spine as you travel back in time to 1824. Don't worry, he's got your back! Do you have his? | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Cynthia Dobson
TALES FROM THE LAND OF ENCHANTMENT: Historical Stories and Captivating Folk Tales

Series: Writers, Storytellers and Poets; New Mexico History and Cultures

Tales from the Land of Enchantment is a program of stories unique to New Mexico. Some stories are long, and some are short, but all tell tales that will introduce the audience to truisms unique to New Mexico combined with stories rich in Southwest folklore. While a number of stories such as La Hormiguita and El Terrible Tragadabas have Spanish in them, Cynthia does not tell stories completely in Spanish. All stories will engage the minds of listeners of all ages and backgrounds and leave them sometimes surprised and amazed, sometimes with shivers, and sometimes with laughter, but always with a better understanding of New Mexico culture. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Camilla Dodson
AFRICAN INSTRUMENTS

Series: Art, Music and Dance; Conversations With the World

Drums are probably the earliest musical instrument, common to all cultures. This presentation describes the role of music in traditional African society using drumming. In Africa, the role of music in society -- for communication, ceremony, oral history, spiritual expression and entertainment -- is so fundamental that many African languages have no word for 'music.' It is simply an ever-present part of life. Several kinds of drums are used in this presentation, and the audience will have a chance to play them. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Camilla Dodson
A FRIENDLY WORLD

Series: Conversations With the World

Despite cultural, racial, or religious differences, all people are equally valuable. This program offers children a fun, non-preachy lesson in this fundamental principle of a civilized society. The program includes poetry, music, and dance based on themes of equality of persons. For classes from pre-school through high school. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Camilla Dodson
WITNESS TO THE WINDS OF CHANGE

Series: Conversations With the World

The themes of religious conflict, political domination, struggle for freedom, and hope for reconciliation appeal to all audiences. This program describes the colonial disruption of traditional village life in Southern Africa, and the fundamental conflicts in Ireland over the past thirty years. The talk is based on tradition, oral history, and the speaker's personal experiences. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Sunny Dooley
DINÉ (NAVAJO) BLESSINGWAY STORIES

Series: Writers, Storytellers and Poets; New Mexico History and Cultures

These Origins stories, in Navajo or English, present the worldview of the Diné people and their relationships with their surroundings. They are the social versions of the sacred chants. They are told only from October through about early March (first thunder). From March through October, a selection of other stories is available. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Sunny Dooley
DINÉ FOLKLORE IN CULTURAL CONTEXT

Series: Writers, Storytellers and Poets; New Mexico History and Cultures

This talk focuses on cultural items significant in maintaining Diné matrilineal teachings. They include the Navajo basket; the woman's traditional dress of moccasins, leggings, dress with sash belt, hair tie and hair brush; goat skins, grinding stones, rock brushes, clay pot, and so on. Can be presented separately or related with traditional stories above. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Kenneth Doss
BUFFALO SOLDIERS: The Story of American Heroes in the Western Territories
Chautauqua as Sgt. John Denny, 9th Cavalry Regiment

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Mr. Ken Doss, as Sgt. John Denny, and one or more of the troopers of the Buffalo Soldiers Society of New Mexico, along with over 50 period artifacts used by the Buffalo Soldiers, bring the history of the Black cavalry to life. From Medal of Honor recipients to the common trooper, from Indian battles to battles with lawbreakers, learn how a small number of Black troopers made a difference in the lives of law-abiding citizens. The Buffalo Soldiers Society of New Mexico teaches how the Buffalo Soldiers (1866-1900) overcame great hardships as they served their nation with honor and distinction. The Society was founded by George Carter, Jim Mitchem, Pete Powdrell and Victor Smith. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. William Dunmire
OUR GIFT FROM SPAIN: How Mediterranean Plants and Foods Came to New Mexico

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Conversations With the World

This slide-illustrated talk relates the story of how Old World cultivated plants and foods made their way from pre-Colombian Spain to the colonial frontier of New Mexico and the greater Southwest. It focuses on the positive contributions of the Spanish colonizers and missionaries and tells of how Puebloans and other native peoples in New Mexico integrated some of the crops and foods into their own cultures. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. William Dunmire
NATIVE PEOPLE OF NORTH AMERICA: What They Grew and Gathered

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

This slide-illustrated talk relates the connections between plants and native people of New Mexico, especially Pueblo and Navajo Indians. It deals with the earliest farming in America but also emphasizes the importance of a host of common wild plants that were gathered to supplement diets; furnish medicine; make fabric dye and pottery paint; provide fiber for baskets, blankets and twine; and many other uses. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. William Dunmire
NEW MEXICO'S LIVING LANDSCAPES

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Sustaining Community

New Mexico is third among states of greatest natural diversity, exceeded only by Texas and California. This program will answer such questions as "Why does the countryside around Las Cruces look so different from that surrounding Albuquerque, Taos, or Farmington?" It will provide an understanding of how and why our countrysides differ so greatly. The slide-illustrated talk takes you through New Mexico's six ecoregions (Chihuahuan Desert bordering Mexico; the Great Basin Desert; the Great Plains Grassland; the alpine Mountain Forests of the Sangre de Cristo, Sandia, and Sacramento Mountains; and the Piñon-Juniper Woodlands) and along some of our magnificent State and National Scenic Byways, from grasslands to mountains to deserts, focusing on the most interesting landscape features and the plants and wildlife that occur there. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. William Dunmire
NEW MEXICO'S SPANISH LIVESTOCK HERITAGE

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Sustaining Community

The program will present on the several species of domestic livestock and then describe how Puebloans and Navajos slowly adopted horses, donkeys, sheep, goats, cattle, pigs, and chickens after their arrival with the Spanish colonists in 1598. It will also discuss how quickly the Plains Indians learned to steal and ride horses, and how horses became central to their economy. The talk will describe how sheep became New Mexico's most important economic animal and will cover the arrival of cattlemen from Texas on the eastern plains and the rising economic importance of cattle in our state, including how cattle replaced the historic herds of bison. Dunmire's program will be illustrated with historic black and white photographs from the 1880s through the 1930s along with contemporary slides of grazing and the effects of overgrazing as well as people involved in ranching activities today. Bill's talk will be based upon his book, New Mexico's Spanish Livestock Heritage: Four Centuries of Animals, Land, and People published by UNM Press. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Diana Enright
STEP RIGHT UP! McNeal's Marvelous Medicine Show is About to Begin...
Chautauqua as Violet McNeal

Series: American Icons

The medicine show era (1800-1940) offered a unique blend of oratory, theatre and marketing in a time when doctors were rare, medical practices painfully barbaric, and germ theory littleknown. Home remedies, patent medicines and self-help almanacs abounded. Violet McNeal, with her Victorian sensibilities, business acumen and natural flair for drawing a crowd, was one of only a handful of women in the business. As "Princess Lotus Blossom" she sold an astonishing array of cures; as Violet, hers was a dynamic voice in the "advertising as entertainment" style of marketing that prevails today. Medical claims in the 21st century are little different than they were over a hundred years ago. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Ralph Estes
THE WEST: Singing Its Story

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Conversations With the World; Writers, Storytellers and Poets

Take a trip through a thousand years of the American West, from Anasazi Indians to the Atomic Age. Like the Indians and cowboys, the trappers and traders, we'll sing as we go because their songs tell a big part of the story. We'll visit the ancient ones, whose lives we can envision in places like Chaco Canyon. We'll see Coronado, with his padres and conquistadors, searching for the Seven Cities of Cibola. Lewis and Clark, guided by the Shoshone girl Sacagawea. The Alamo, Santa Fe Trail, and the forty-niners followed by thousands of settlers. We'll saddle up and ride through the cowboy era, and meet characters like Wyatt Earp, Doc Holliday, Calamity Jane, Wild Bill Hickok, Geronimo, Billy the Kid, Buffalo Bill, Jesse James. And we'll ponder how atomic power, developed in our West, changed the world and often leads to a longing for a more innocent time. A longing that causes many of us to turn our faces to the West. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Ralph Estes
ME AND BILLY
Chautauqua as Billy the Kid

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

The "world's oldest living cowboy" tells, in story and song, of his years as a cowboy and his friendship with Billy the Kid. Stories about Billy the Kid are generally exaggerated. This program addresses the legend-making process while presenting the story of Billy that is supported by historical evidence. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dede Feldman
BOOTS, SUITS AND CITIZENS: New Mexico’s Unique Legislative Culture

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

This program is designed to present an overview of the New Mexico legislature and how citizens can constructively engage with it. Our citizens’ legislature is a reflection of the state’s history—the divide between the rural and urban lifestyles, the unique mix of ethnic groups, and the personal and familial connections at the heart of a small state. Spanish might be spoken in the hallways of the Roundhouse as much as English, and Native American issues are often pivotal. My talk illustrates this culture with tales of heroes, villains, unlikely alliances, special interests, and successful advocates—informed by my 16 years in the legislature. Knowledge of historical antecedents and contemporary history allows citizens to place each session of the legislature in perspective. I have been amazed at how little New Mexicans know about the “Roundhouse,” and how appreciative they are to find out what they did not learn in school—how a bill becomes law, why governors and legislatures disagree and why newspapers do not tell the full story. Knowledge of the process will help empower citizens to become active and effective advocates for their own cause and make more informed electoral choices. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Kathryn Flynn
THE NEW DEAL IS STILL A GOOD DEAL! And There is Still a Great Deal of it Right Here in New Mexico!

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Writers, Storytellers and Poets

Between 1933-43 folks got paid by the federal government to use their knowledge, skills, talent, and experience and even learn new things. The New Deal gave people opportunities to put food on the table again! What did people do and where? Who were these people? Are the products of the New Deal still here for you to see today? Clues will be provided for finding New Deal treasures. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Mary Ellen Gonzales
STORIES TO BRIDGE CULTURES

Series: Writers, Storytellers and Poets; New Mexico History and Cultures

Mary Ellen Gonzales is half Hispanic and half Anglo, making her a "culture bridger." She tells Hispanic stories and puts them into cultural and historical context. She also tells ghost and creation stories from many cultures. She challenges audiences of all ages to think about why things happen the way they do and how they feel about it. She brings sparkle, energy and charm to groups from elementary schools to libraries and museums. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Steve Harris
A RIVER THIRSTING FOR ITSELF: An Environmental History of the Rio Grande

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Beginning with the transformation of ancient watersheds into the present-day river, this one-hour talk traces the history of settlement, agriculture and water development in New Mexico, Colorado and the borderlands. It includes the rise of such institutions as land grants, state water codes, the Rio Grande Compact and international treaties, and includes underlying and present environmental conditions. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Arnold Herrera
THE WAY OF THE DRUM

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Art, Music and Dance

This presentation is a way into the Cochiti Pueblo world told from personal experiences, traditional stories and teachings. While demonstrating steps in constructing the famous Cochiti drum, Mr. Herrera tells about tribal political structures, language, ceremony, clans and moiety membership, roles of men, women and children, and modern Pueblo social problems. This journey covers the period from the 1940s to the present. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Brenda Hollingsworth-Marley
STORYTELLING FOR ALL SEASONS

Series: Writers, Storytellers and Poets

Ms. Hollingsworth-Marley tells stories from many traditions and places them in cultural context. Children love her zany puppets, like Opera Woman, a contagiously hilarious way to introduce forms of music to kids. She also offers a selection of stories for adults. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Brenda Hollingsworth-Marley
BILLIE HOLIDAY: Singin' the Blues
Chautauqua as Billie Holiday

Series: American Icons; Art, Music and Dance

The late great Ms. Billie Holiday, also known as "Lady Day," was born to sing her blues in jazzy sultry tones from coast to coast. Billie's personal life was tumultuous and the difficulties of poverty, racial prejudice and a world at war created a complex backdrop for a sadness the "Lady" was unable to overcome. Introduced to Harlem and the Harlem Renaissance in the late 1920’s and the Great Depression in the 1930s, Holiday used her unique singing style to work with Benny Goodman, Teddy Wilson, Bessie Smith and a host of blues and jazz greats of her time. During her career she fought many battles, but her battle with drugs was to overcome her talent and take her life. Known for her rendition of "Strange Fruit" the memory of Billie Holiday has endured through generations of jazz lovers. Brenda Hollingsworth-Marley brings to life Billie's story with a haunting refrain of pain and pleasure ... Ladies and Gentleman please welcome "The Lady." | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Brenda Hollingsworth-Marley
FOOTSTEPS TO FREEDOM: From Jim Crow to Civil Rights
Chautauqua as Coretta Scott King, Rosa Parks

Series: Conversations With the World; American Icons

This program explores the history of the civil rights movement through the lives of two powerful women: Rosa Parks, the African-American seamstress who refused to give up her seat to a white woman on a segregated bus; and Coretta Scott King, the widow of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Coretta was the phenomenal force behind the throne who never faltered in her dedication. She was a singer who gave up her career to support her husband and the hard pathway to freedom. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Brenda Hollingsworth-Marley
LENA HORNE
Chautauqua as Lena Horne

Series: Art, Music and Dance; American Icons

In 1933, beautiful 16-year-old Lena Horne began dancing at the legendary Cotton Club in Harlem. She went on to become the first African American woman to sign a contract with a Hollywood studio. Fighting discrimination from whites and blacks, she won critical acclaim for her distinctive singing style and a Tony for her Broadway show at the age of 65. Her life was truly grace amid "Stormy Weather." | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Johanna and Scott Hongell-Darsee
STORYTELLING THEATRE WITH LIVE MUSIC

Series: Writers, Storytellers and Poets

Johanna Hongell-Darsee; storyteller, dancer, mime; and Scott Darsee, guitarist, composer take you on a journey of stories. The art of storytelling is universal and as ancient as humanity; our dreams of a distant common past. In this presentation we tell stories using music, song, masks, dance and mime. Stories travel and have always traveled. On their way they pick up bits and pieces of different cultures and landscapes but the heroes and heroines, the villains and the mysterious creatures often stay familiar. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Johanna and Scott Hongell-Darsee
MEDIEVAL AND TRADITIONAL BALLADS

Series: Writers, Storytellers and Poets; Conversations With the World

In this program we present ballads and songs from Scandinavia, the British Isles, France, the U.S., and India together with the stories behind these songs that have wandered through centuries and over continents. The songs we call medieval and traditional ballads today are thought to have originated at the French courts in the middle ages and later spread to the rest of Europe, and eventually to the U.S. However the tradition of singing stories is as ancient as humanity itself. Epics have been handed down this way since the dawn of time. The French medieval ballads told stories of romance and drama and quickly became popular all over the courts of Europe. They also spread among the general population and were handed down both in written form and in oral tradition. This tradition is not only confined to Europe. It is very possible that many of the ballads would have originated in the Middle East or even further away and spread through traveling troubadours. Such as the ballad of a runaway bride that can be found both in Punjab, Finland and the U.S. This is a fascinating example of cultural exchanges over centuries and continents. http://www.hongelldarsee.com | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Jon Hunner
BECOMING A STATE DIFFERENT: New Mexico's March to Statehood

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

New Mexico's March to Statehood could just as easily be called The Stumble to Statehood. New Mexico faced many obstacles, both internal and external, to winning its official status as a state. This lecture, illustrated with photos and documents from the time period, surveys the history of New Mexico's progress from a territory of the U.S. established in 1850 to a state in 1912. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Jon Hunner
A FORK IN THE ROAD: J. Robert Oppenheimer and the Cold War

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; American Icons; Conversations With the World

This presentation explores how J. Robert Oppenheimer, the director of the Los Alamos lab that created the atomic bomb for the Manhattan Project, participated in the post war policy-making which helped direct the nascent nuclear weapons program of the nation. "Oppie" was a key figure in the U.S. nuclear weapons program from 1945 to 1954 as he chaired important governmental committees. He also was a public intellectual who wrote and lectured about the Atomic Age and nuclear science across the country and internationally. In the early 1950s, he was subjected to a security clearance procedure that revoked his top secret clearance and removed his influence from nuclear policy making. His hearing is an interesting event that showed the tenor of the Red Scare of the times, a fascinating example of the contested relationship between science and society in regards to nuclear weapons, public policy, and the Cold War. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Bob Julyan
THE PLACE NAMES OF NEW MEXICO

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Sangre de Cristo, Custer Mountain, Chi-chil-tah, Mogollon- such intriguing names, rich with anecdotes and folklore. But place names also offer unique insights into the history and values of the state's peoples. With humor and local examples tailored to your locale, Bob Julyan gives audiences a lively names tour of the New Mexico landscape. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Stephanie Kearny
INTEGRITY IN AN IMPERIALISTIC AGE: The Man Who Led the Take Over of the Southwest and California

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

In 1846, General Stephen Watts Kearny led the "bloodless conquest" of New Mexico, where he established a civil government, instituted a legal system that incorporated existing Mexican law and land grants, and was ahead of his time in respecting cultural diversity and human rights. His fascinating expedition -- which added almost a third to America's current territory -- involved the Mormon Battalion, Kit Carson, and a clash with Fremont and Stockton. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. M. Jimmie Killingsworth
NUCLEAR NEW MEXICO: The Tour

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Conversations With the World

First there was eco-tourism. Now there’s nuclear tourism. The two have more in common than you might think. When the first bomb exploded at Trinity Site, and Robert Oppenheimer invoked the famous phrase “destroyer of worlds,” the destiny of the environmental movement—“saving the planet”—also sprang into being. The power to destroy and the power to save the earth, once allotted to the gods, fell into human hands for the first time in history. Now for every site of interest in nuclear history, there’s a corresponding site of natural preservation—Trinity Site alongside the Bosque del Apache, Los Alamos bordering Bandelier National Monument, the WIPP site paired with Carlsbad Caverns. The New Mexico landscape reflects the double image of modern humanity as destroyer and savior of the planet—an image of expanded power mapped onto the land and also explored in contemporary culture, in Native literature, popular fiction, film, and especially comic books and graphic novels. This presentation offers a meditation on the new status of humanity and a virtual tour that mixes still photography with a talk based on the book in progress, Nuclear New Mexico: The Tour by M. Jimmie Killingsworth and Jacqueline Palmer (writers) and James Frost (photographer). | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Bryan Konefsky
EXPERIMENTAL CINEMA AND THE POLITICS OF CULTURAL REPRESENTATION

Series: Conversations With the World

Experimental Cinema and the Politics of Cultural Representation introduces audiences to lesser known cinematic histories as a way of diversifying the current statewide conversation about the legacy of filmmaking in New Mexico and how this media history informs ways in which we think about ourselves as New Mexicans. The goal of this program is to inspire a diverse citizenship to participate in shaping future trends in cultural representation. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Kay Kuhlmann
WILD ABOUT HARRY: Bess Truman
Chautauqua as Bess Truman

Series: American Icons; Conversations With the World

Wild About Harry explores events in American history and changes in American culture and the political landscape over 50 years from the perspective of an unelected insider. Bess appears from the vantage of her final week as first lady in 1953, conducting her last White House tour for a group from New Mexico. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Kay Kuhlmann
THE WAY YOU RIDE THE TRAIL
Chautauqua as Dale Evans

Series: American Icons

Dale Evans appears as a Chautauqua character in The Way You Ride the Trail. The stage portrait, presented by Kay Sebring-Roberts Kuhlmann of Ruidoso, takes its title from a line in "Happy Trails to You," the theme song Dale composed for her husband, Roy Rogers. The audience meets Dale at two stages in her life: as a film, television, and recording artist while raising a blended family of seven children; and as an inspirational author. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Jack Loeffler
THINKING LIKE A WATERSHED

Series: Sustaining Community

Loeffler focuses on the importance of perceiving watersheds as complete eco-systems of which their own species is but one of many. He addresses the effects of damming wild rivers, the imposition of geo-political boundaries and the error of perceiving water as a commodity to be turned into money. He illustrates diverse points of view from interviews he has recorded with in the Columbia, Colorado and Rio Grande watersheds. He cites the revered Russian philosopher, Pyotr Kropotkin, who contended that evolution of species and culture owes far more to mutual cooperation than to mutual antagonism. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Jack Loeffler
THE PRACTICE OF AURAL HISTORY

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Sustaining Community

Aural history is the recorded documentation of sound. The term may be defined as the audio recording of an event, spoken narrative as in oral history, ambient sound, seasonal sounds of specific habitats, voices of individual species. Jack Loeffler has been engaged in aural history since 1964 and has amassed a sizable archive which will be donated to the Palace of the Governors History Museum of New Mexico. He draws from this archive and his extensive experience to provide audio glimpses into the extraordinary aural mosaic that mantles the southwestern quadrant of the North American continent. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Jack Loeffler
ADVENTURES WITH ED

Series: Writers, Storytellers and Poets

This talk addresses the life of environmental anarchist Edward Abbey and includes readings from Loeffler's biographical memoir of his late best friend. Together, Abbey and Loeffler ranged the American Southwest engaged in a conversation that lasted for decades. Loeffler recalls some adventures and speaks of the complex points of view that led Abbey to launch the radical environmental movement. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Jessica Lopez
BORDERLANDS POETICS AND SLAM POETRY: How the Spoken Word Empowers Us All

Series: Writers, Storytellers and Poets; New Mexico History and Cultures; Conversations With the World

No matter what roaming peoples, migratory tides, or cultures/civilizations from across wind-swept continents, land bridges, and oceans that have been settled and founded, the oral tradition is an ancient means of conveying information. It is the way we share our stories. And it must be recognized that the story of the storyteller is indeed a most interesting and necessary role of the human species. I propose that, as a storyteller/poet/spoken word artist myself, that it is important that I share the message of poetry. It is not an esoteric form of communication meant only for those pedigreed and who reside within the walls of academe. Rather, poetry is of the people. It belongs to the people. It has been and is continuously shaped by the people who dwell within borderlands. These borderlands can be geographical boundaries, both man-made and imagined lines in the sand, or the “in-betweenness” that resides within all of us. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Lucinda Lucero Sachs
CLYDE TINGLEY: An Extraordinary Man

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Mayor Clyde Tingley introduced sewers, paving, a professional fire and police force, a city owned water system, located New Mexico's first state fair in Albuquerque, brought a beach to the desert, built with New Deal money the first municipal airport and brought in the first military base to Albuquerque. An individual of immense energy, he extended his political talent to provide development to all of New Mexico. As New Deal Governor, Tingley brought New Mexico into the modern era. He maintained his friendship with President Roosevelt, controlled a political machine, and possessed the perspicacity to hire talented people. The Governor kept his promise to create private and government jobs for Depression New Mexicans. His New Deal built highways, dams, over 700 schools, laid sewers, landscaped and added necessary buildings and renovations to the state's colleges, introduced an oil and gas commission, and made tourism the number one industry and oil the second largest. With new infrastructure, New Mexico for the first time possessed the capacity to expand economic opportunities. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Pam Lujan Hauer
PUEBLO POTTERY

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Southwestern Pueblo pottery is an art-form with a long and rich tradition. Pam Lujan-Hauer, potter from the Taos Pueblo, demonstrates her art and tells the story of pottery, from the history of clay as an art form and the origins of the earliest pottery, to the threats to traditional pottery. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Consuelo Luz
SEPHARDIC SURVIVAL: The Balance of the Kabbalistic Heart

Series: Art, Music and Dance

Sephardic Jews have much to teach us about survival and peace. In North Africa and the Middle East they coexisted peacefully for centuries with their Arab neighbors. In their golden age in Spain they influenced Spanish culture, adopted their language, Ladino, and developed, with Christians and Muslims, the mystical tradition of the Kabbalah. Their exile and persecution after the Inquisition led to their Crypto-Jewish experience in places like northern New Mexico. Luz weaves music, political history and her family's stories. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Consuelo Luz
REBECA ROMERO DE ESPINOSA, a 17th Century hidden Jew
Chautauqua as converso, or Crypto Jew

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Conversations With the World

On August 26, 1660, the Holy Office of the Inquisition arrested Governor of New Mexico Bernardo López de Mendizábal and his wife Doña Teresa de Aguilera y Roche on suspicions of Judaizing. The dramatic events surrounding this arrest are recounted by Rebeca (a fictional character), close friend of Doña Teresa and herself a hidden Jew who sings Ladino songs and talks about the inner drive she feels to hold on to her Jewish identity in spite of the risks. Rebeca describes the hidden Jewish practices of her own family and what she has learned about Native American ways and how they tie in with ancient Jewish traditions. She also shares her views on the use of religion as a political tool as she laments the long arm of the cruel Inquisition "...reaching even to the end of the Earth, the blessed mountains of New Mexico where we thought we could be safe. Will the exile ever end?" | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Consuelo Luz
GABRIELA MISTRAL: Chilean Poet and Nobel Laureate (1889-1957)
Chautauqua as Gabriela Mistral

Series: Writers, Storytellers and Poets

Born Lucila Godoy in the Andes in the north of Chile, this mestiza of humble origins became a teacher and later transformed herself into beloved Gabriela Mistral. She won the Nobel Prize for Literature and was appointed to diplomatic posts in New York, Europe and Latin America. With poetry and song, Luz brings to life Mistral's genius, her deep spirituality, her romantic obsessions and her abiding devotion to children. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Tom Maguire
BARBARIANS AT THE GATE: Stravinsky, Diaghilev & the Ballets Russes

Series: Conversations With the World; Art, Music and Dance

This presentation offers a detailed look at the time between the first season of impresario Serge Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes in 1909 and Diaghilev’s death in Venice two decades later. In stunning visuals accompanied by music clips, Mr. Maguire examines the artistic forces and personalities that forged a reinvigoration of the art of ballet and traces, not only the history of the company, but also the artistic explosion that Serge Diaghilev unleashed on Western Europe and the effect that the visual artists, composers, librettists, choreographers, dancers and designers associated with the Ballets Russes had on their own art forms and the cultural life of Europe. The presentation concentrates on the work of composers Stravinsky, Ravel, Satie, Debussy and Prokofiev; visual artists Benois, Picasso, Bakst and Braque and choreographers Fokine, Massine, Nijinsky, Nijinska and Balanchine. These artists and their influence on the artistic life of Europe, in general, and Paris, in particular, are chronicled; along with the roles played by the aristocrats, members of high society and the business class, donors and sponsors who made their work possible. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Larry Marken
RENDEZVOUS WITH OLD BILL WILLIAMS
Chautauqua as Old Bill Williams

Series: Conversations With the World

William S. "Old Bill" Williams was one of the most colorful, adventuresome, and proficiently literate of the 19th Century western mountain men. During his 62 years, he preached, trapped, traded, scouted for military expeditions, guided wagon trains, served as an interpreter of Native American languages and wrote an Osage-English dictionary. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Bill Martin
MYSTERY, MYTH, & MAGIC: Houdini

Series: American Icons

This presentation will include a discussion of the incredible life and times of Houdini, the greatest magician, escape artist and showman of his time. Bill martin will appear as be believes Houdini would return today; as the "GREAT and MAGNIFICENT SWAMI SALAMI." A magic show and discussion will follow, tailored for your appropriate age group from 5th grade to senior citizen. Throughout the show, you will learn how the Jewish kid from Budapest became known as the "the great self-liberator" to the new American immigrants, and how his dangerous escapes became metaphors for their personal freedom and newfound belief in themselves. Escapes will be demonstrated. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Bill Martin
THE GREAT ATLANTIC AIR RACE

Series: Conversations With the World

In 1916, the London Daily Mail offered a $50,000 cash prize for the first aircraft to cross the Atlantic. Many intrepid aeronauts attempted to be the first but none succeeded until 1919. Battling against time and weather to beat a British Army crew and other international competitors, a U.S. Navy Crew was the first to make the perilous crossing despite multiple mechanical failures. The details of this harrowing flight will be covered as will the development of the Curtis flying boat. In 1969, the London Daily Mail sponsored a modern Atlantic air race commemorating the 50th anniversary of the historic event. $144, 000 in prize money again prompted feverish activity among international competitors. The two races, separated by 50 years, will be discussed. An historic film of the NC-4 departing Rockaway, NY and arriving in Lisbon and London will be shown. This presentation is in Power Point format with press clippings on display. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Bill Martin
tHE PORGY AND BESS OPERA WORLD TOUR, 1952-1956: Defeating Segregation in America and the Cold War in Russia

Series: Conversations With the World; Art, Music and Dance; American Icons

The Robert Breen production of the Porgy and Bess folk opera was a surprising force in desegregating theaters, hotels and public accommodations in America during the 1950's. Director and co-producer Robert Breen fought relentlessly to ensure that the public establishments treated his cast of 60 African-Americans with dignity and respect. The cast of talented artists included Leontyne Price, Cab Calloway, Martha Flowers, William Warfield, Maya Angelou and others who went on to open many doors previously closed to black actors. This highly acclaimed production toured five continents in four years and was the first American company to tour Russia since the Bolshevik revolution. Each cast member became an ambassador of good will as they played extended tours to packed houses and standing ovations. Often members of the cast would entertain impromptu in local clubs much to the delight of the local population. Overcoming racial tensions in America, and Communist intrigue during the height of the cold war, are part of this untold story. The history of the opera by Dubose Heyward and George and Ira Gershwin will be discussed with emphasis on the Breen production. This presentation is in Power Point format with photos of the cast throughout the tour. Related international correspondence and colorful posters will be on display. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Bill Martin
THE PILOT WITH A MAGIC HAT: Escape in Vietnam

Series: Conversations With the World

Bill Martin commanded an all-volunteer unit of Navy helicopter gunships stationed deep in the Mekong Delta in 1967 and 1968. His unit was part of the famed Seawolf Squadron which was the most highly decorated navy squadron of the Vietnam war. This PowerPoint presentation depicts the sights and sounds of actual combat during some of the fierce battles of the Tet offensive. Bill will explain his role in the freeing of 33 South Vietnamese POW's and his unusual part in the dramatic and hair-raising rescue of 200 orphans and eight nuns from the clutches of the Vietcong. Under the seat of his chopper he carried a folding magic table, collapsible top hat and a bag of tricks. Between firefights he popped into jungle villages more than 50 times to entertain families. This activity gained friends as well as important intelligence information but was not without risk. During one show a brave little girl spirited him out of the village just as the Vietcong were arriving. The infuriated Vietcong placed a price on his head. He will demonstrate a rope escape that probably saved his life when two Vietcong tied his hands behind his back on a jungle trail. Bill will demonstrate how he stunned his captors by escaping before their very eyes using a technique from a Houdini book. He will also perform some of his "Magic of the Delta." He will answer questions and offer insight into the tragic emotional struggles that still plague many Vietnam vets. Artifacts will be on display. A children's version, 5th grade and up, with less combat and more magic is available. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Chuy Martinez
SONGS OF THE CHICANO MOVEMENT

Series: Art, Music and Dance; New Mexico History and Cultures

In the 1960s and 70s, Mexican-American civil rights activists mobilized their people to struggle for change. The Chicano Movement called itself La Causa (The Cause) and was most active in New Mexico, Colorado, Texas and California. Chuy Martinez brings the music and history alive in the stirring songs learned in migrant camps and meetings. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Chuy Martinez
AN AMERICAN DIALOGUE: Latin American Ballads, Cumbia, and Nueva Canción

Series: Conversations With the World; Art, Music and Dance

For decades, a rich conversation has been exchanging musical ideas between the Americas: the ballad, from Spain and Mexico; the cumbia, of Caribbean African/Indian roots; and nueva cancion (new song), social struggle music influenced by U.S. labor and protest songs. Mr. Martinez puts the songs and rhythms in historical context. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Andy Mason
A BRIEF HISTORY OF CHRISTMAS MUSIC

Series: Art, Music and Dance

Who wrote the 12 Days of Christmas? Why is Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer so popular? Who sang Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree? What was the first Christmas song to be performed in outer space? Did Frosty the Snowman really come to life? And, why do we love holiday music so much? From 16th century West Country English Christmas carols to Christmas music from the new millennium and EVERYTHING in between, Andy Mason will present fascinating Christmas history and trivia through music. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Lynn Miller
GERTRUDE STEIN, EDITH WHARTON AND THE FOOL'S JOURNEY

Series: Writers, Storytellers and Poets

The presentation is a hybrid of lecture, autobiography, and performance, and draws from Lynn Miller's research and expertise on performing historical auto/biography. It details Stein's life as art collector, innovative writer, and creator of a salon that brought together major international artists at her home in Paris. Wharton's critique of society's treatment of women and her struggles to escape Old New York and its strictures are main themes in this presentation. Working with these two writers enabled Miller to write a novel, "The Fool's Journey," where the main character writes a biography of Edith Wharton's life in the early part of the 20th century which parallels her own contemporary conflicts and journey. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Diana Molina
RARAMURI: The Foot Runners of the Sierra Madre

Series: Conversations With the World

Raramuri, Uto-Aztecan for Tarahumara, are among the world's best runners from lives spent traversing the canyon walls and plateaus of the Sierra Madre Occidental in northern Mexico. In a personal narrative complimented by anthropological, ethnographic and scientific research, Diana Molina will feature the exceptional Raramuri culture, discuss the impact of modern society on their lifestyle and highlight the amazing expanse of the canyon environment with stunning photographs taken while living among the tribe for extended periods of time. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Diana Molina
MORENA MODERNA, CONTEMPORARY VISIONS OF OUR LADY OF GUADALUPE

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Art, Music and Dance

As a modern symbol of empowerment, La Virgen de Guadalupe inspires an impassioned and universal fervor. In a multi-faceted photographic portrayal, a panorama of vibrant imagery embodies the spirit of the popular symbol of heritage in a contemporary cultural context. A journey that spans transnational borders visits traditional celebrations and depicts the icon's integration within the media, commercialism and politics of the day. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Diana Molina
SEVEN STRING BARBED WIRE FENCE: The Many Faces of Latino Immigration in the U.S.

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Conversations With the World

Seven String Barbed-Wire Fence aims to provide a balanced, informative account of the often emotionally-charged issue of Latino Immigration to the U.S. A polyphonic multimedia presentation gives a human face to the issue: different voices, independent and disunited are bound by the common theme of immigration. Photos, montages, three-dimensional installation examples, and a short video document the formidable barriers along the border environment and provide a comprehensive portrayal of the actors and arguments within the post-9/11 debate over policy reform. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Diana Molina
ICONS AND SYMBOLS OF OUR REGIONAL HERITAGE

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Sustaining Community

Regional artist Diana Molina will present an eclectic, multi-faceted portrayal that embodies the spirit of New Mexico's heritage through symbols and iconographic representations, sometimes with a distinctly modern twist. A photographic collection illustrates popular symbols and those less familiar. The Virgin of Guadalupe and Mimbres Rock Art are among the topics covered in a presentation that includes a blend of tradition, history, contemporary culture, and nature and socio-political subject matter. Touching on the current issues that face our borderland community, the artist's work as a photographer and exhibit curator provides a compelling representation of topics relevant to the national conversation and our place within it. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Margaret Montoya
MASCARAS, TRENZAS Y GREÑAS (Masks, Braids and Messy Hair)

Series: Sustaining Community; New Mexico History and Cultures

This talk explores the ethnic and racial differences that characterize New Mexico. Montoya explores stories in poetry and prose about assimilation and cultural differences in families and at work. The talk is an optimistic call for greater cultural pluralism. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Margaret Montoya
SILENCE: Listening to Its Many Meanings

Series: Sustaining Community; New Mexico History and Cultures

Does "silence" mean people have nothing to say? Montoya argues that Hispanas and other women of color tell their stories using techniques- like silence- unfamiliar to mainstream listeners. This talk can make us all become more adept at communication. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Margaret Montoya and Diana V. Martinez
NAME NARRATIVES: An Interactive Exploration of identity, Histories, Race and Culture

Series: Conversations With the World; New Mexico History and Cultures

Names are deeply personal. Names connect us to our immediate families, our ancestors, our communities; the places where we live, love, work, and die. Names can reveal or obfuscate our race, gender, religion, language(s), marital status, as well as assimilation tendencies or resistance. Names can open the doors of opportunity or close them. We can love or reject our names, choose new ones, prefer nicknames, endure names that don’t fit, be subjected to teasing because of our names. Our identities, including racial identities, are a social (and legal) construction, and we participate in that process of construction when we examine and tell stories about our names and the histories they reveal. In short, name stories are an opening into an examination, formation and transformation of personal, familial, and community identities. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. VanAnn Moore
AMAZING WOMEN OF THE WILD WEST: Territorial New Mexico
Chautauqua as Doña Tules Barcelo, Susan Shelby Magoffin, and Lydia Spencer Lane

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

One of the most dramatic eras of New Mexico’s rich history is the Territorial period when the United States first raised the American flag on August 18, 1846 over the plaza of Santa Fe for the first time. This program examines the territorial women through living history portrayals of Doña Tules (Gertrudes Barcelo), Susan Shelby Magoffin, and Lydia Spencer Lane. These women represented what it took to survive and thrive during very colorful and extremely challenging times in New Mexico’s Territorial Era. It brings history into an understandable and personal reality. Doña Tules opened Santa Fe and New Mexico to America; through Susan Magoffin’s detailed journal we understand the beginning of New Mexico as a Territory; and through Lydia Spencer Lane we experience frontier military life and the beginning of the American Civil War out West. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. VanAnn Moore
DOLLEY MADISON
Chautauqua as Dolley Madison

Series: American Icons

Dolley Madison (1768 - 1849) was a survivor of wars, intrigue, and challenges beyond the call of duty. Dolley Payne Todd was a grieving Quaker widow when she married James Madison: the Father of the U.S. Constitution, a future President, and the dearest love of her life. Dolley began her political career as the confidante and best friend of Martha Washington, and Aaron Burr, among others. She acted as hostess for eight years for President Thomas Jefferson, and became one of the nation’s most brilliant First Ladies from 1809-1917. It was Dolley who displayed amazing courage when the British attacked Washington D.C. during the War of 1812. Statesman Henry Clay exclaimed, “Everybody loves Mrs. Madison!” Even her husband’s enemies admired Dolley’s tact and diplomacy. She would become an advisor and friend of every President from Washington to President Polk. One cannot say enough about the “wonderful Mrs. Madison,” and her advice to the Unites States today to never give up the fight to preserve our unique Constitutional government, and our God-given rights to freedom! | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. VanAnn Moore
FRED HARVEY'S SOUTHWEST COURIERS: "All Aboard!!!"
Chautauqua as Fred Harvey courier, or guide

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; American Icons

A new breed of courageous, intelligent, and hard-working women traveled west from the 1880’s as Harvey Girls, and then as Southwestern Detour Couriers from the 1920’s through the great depression. The railroads and the Fred Harvey system encouraged these young unmarried girls to head west to work for him, and become a part of the Southwestern landscape. The college-educated Detour Couriers, or Tour Guides, were a major part of the travel industry enlightening travelers about the history, and unique beauty of the entire southwest. Along with young men who drove the touring cars, and buses, these women took willing passengers off of the railroads and from the Fred Harvey Hotels to the ancient Indian Pueblos, National Parks (such as Bandelier, Carlsbad Caverns, and the Grand Canyon), and other places of interest. They were “walking-talking billboards” for the history, beauty and opportunities of the then little-known southwest. Grab your walking shoes, cameras, and a hat as we once again bump along the old dirt roads to take a detour of the grand southwest! | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. VanAnn Moore
SOPRANOS AND SIX-SHOOTERS: Great Ladies of the Old Western Theatre
Chautauqua as Sarah Bernhardt, Lillian Russell

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Art, Music and Dance

Everyone likes to be entertained, and early days in the old West was no exception! Early theatrical troupes featuring the actresses and singers of the day were always a welcome sight, especially in the mining towns and other places "out-in-the-sticks." Some of the earliest stars who braved the rugged traveling conditions in a stage coach or wagon over mountainous roads and high desert trails were Lillie Langtree, Sarah Bernhardt, Lillian Russell, Lotta Crabtree, and the famous Lola Montez. Primitive conditions often greeted these talented women, and sometimes their audiences wore their six-shooters right into the theatres. In New Mexico there were numerous old Opera Houses in Cerrillos, Raton, Albuquerque, and Socorro. But anywhere a tent or school, saloon or stable could create a "make-shift place," you could have your entertainment. These famous women performers traveled everywhere to give their audiences excitement, diversion and charm that can only be re-imagined in this enticing performance by VanAnn Moore. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Bruce Noll
WALT WHITMAN'S AMERICA
Chautauqua as Walt Whitman

Series: Writers, Storytellers and Poets; American Icons

Carl Sandburg wrote, "Whitman's Leaves of Grass is the solemn oath that America means something and is going somewhere . . . America's most classic advertisement of itself as having purpose, destiny, banners and beacon-fires." After 150 years, Whitman still sounds so familiar, so inspiring to Americans, or any people longing for promise, hope, sensuality and generosity of spirit. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Ned O'Malia
YOGIS, SIKHS, AND ZEN MASTERS ALONG THE RIO GRANDE

Series: Conversations With the World

In the late 1960s, new and non-traditional religious groups followed an influx of Flower Children, Hippies and spiritual commune builders to northern New Mexico. The Lama Foundation, Sikh Dharma in Espanola, Tibetan Stupas along the Rio Grande and other sites remain. This illustrated lecture examines these late arriving Eastern religions in New Mexico: their introduction, evolution and present status and the unusual tales of how they chose northern New Mexico. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Ned O'Malia
THE SPIRIT OF PLACE: Sacred Northern New Mexico

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Northern New Mexico is home to a diversity of spiritual traditions: Catholic, Protestant, Eastern, Native American, new age and communal. Into this small geographic area of Native American practice came Catholicism, Hermano/Penitentaes, Converso Jews and Protestant missionaries. Starting in the 1960's, as if drawn by the earth, sky and water itself, came communities of Muslims, Hindus, Sikhs, and a variety of Buddhist traditions. Spiritual and social communes rapidly developed in the mountains of north central New Mexico. This illustrated PowerPoint lecture reviews the many traditional and contemporary spiritual communities. We end with a focus on the reasons why so many spiritual groups have been attracted to this unique portion of New Mexico. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Ned O'Malia
OUR MUSLIM NEIGHBORS

Series: Sustaining Community

Islam is the fastest-growing religion in the world; it may also be the most misunderstood. There are now more Muslims in America than Jews or Presbyterians. There are over 1,400 mosques in the United States. This PowerPoint illustrated lecture will review the Five Pillars of Islam and Mohammed the prophet of Islam. The growth of Islam in America will be traced through several Black National movements, especially Malcolm X and the Black Muslims. A rapid increase in Muslim population came with immigration reforms in 1964. These reforms ushered in a generation of educated, Americanized immigrant Muslims. Demographics, national population statistics, and political associations will be discussed. Islam in New Mexico is a special feature. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Alan Osborne
JOURNEY INTO THE MIST OF TIME: New Mexico's Colorful Past

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

We'll journey back to the pre-Columbian New Mexico cultures, the coming of Spain, Indian- Spanish relations, and the Mexican and American takeovers. New Mexico is maligned, if mentioned, in American history books and this presentation will correct some of the cultural stereotypes and misinformation common outside the Southwest. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Alan Osborne
THE REDISCOVERY OF NEW MEXICO BETWEEN CORONADO AND OÑATE

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

In this little-known period, Spanish explorers entered New Mexico Pueblo country and left behind a legacy of contact and conflict. We'll look at the Rodriquez-Chamuscado, Espejo, Castaño de Sosa, and Humana-Bonilla expeditions. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Alan Osborne
NEW MEXICO BEFORE COLUMBUS

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

New Mexico before Columbus, prior to the European Age of Discovery, is a long and fascinating human story which was often overlooked or condensed in our history books in favor of the Colonial explorations, settlements, and stories. Now we have the advantage of more than a half-century of state-sponsored archaeological investigations and more than a century of anthropological fascination with New Mexico and the Southwest. We are living in one of the most studied cultural area in North America north of Mexico and with well more than one hundred thousand identified historical sites cataloged from the long span of human time here. This presentation will look at the time before Columbus and include paleo-Indian, archaic, and classic ancestral cultures whose presence is now much clearer and better understood. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Dwight Pitcaithley
NEW MEXICO AND THE COMING OF THE AMERICAN CIVIL WAR

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

As the U.S. Civil War approached, wrangling in Congress over how slavery should be handled in the West led Representative Thomas Corwin to observe after Lincoln's election that New Mexico was "the great battlefield on which the South and North meet in wicked, foolish, fratricidal strife." This presentation traces the role the New Mexico Territory played in the sectional conflict of the 1850s leading to secession and war. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Lesley Poling-Kempes
THE HARVEY GIRLS AND THE SANTA FE RAILWAY: Myth, Legend and History

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Writers, Storytellers and Poets

The Santa Fe Railway and the Fred Harvey Company were responsible for the creation and promotion of the Mythic Southwest as a tourist destination. The Harvey Girls' role in the opening of the West has become legendary, their lives forever linked with the Grand Canyon, Santa Fe, and the exotic and elegant resorts built along the railroad in the early years of this century. In this slide show/lecture, learn how Harvey and the Santa Fe influenced the art and architecture of the Southwest, and how the Harvey Girls became synonymous with adventure and romance in the golden years of American railroad travel. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Lesley Poling-Kempes
LADIES OF THE CANYONS

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Writers, Storytellers and Poets

Ladies of the Canyons is a lecture/slide show about remarkable women who left the security and comforts of genteel Victorian society and journeyed to the American Southwest in search of a wider view of themselves and their world. Educated, restless, and inquisitive, Natalie Curtis, Carol Stanley, Alice Klauber, and Mary Cabot Wheelwright each left behind the comforts and confines of upper-class American society to explore the land and cultures of the exotic Four Corners Indian Country. They came into the Southwest between 1900 and1922 when the region’s indigenous people were undergoing cultural assault and intellectual scrutiny by the “civilized” world. Each of these women became art and cultural preservationists years before these causes were recognized as American ideals. Their friends included Louisa Wade Wetherill, Alice Corbin Henderson, Mabel Dodge Luhan, Elsie Clews Parsons, Mary Austin, and Willa Cather. Their adventures took them to Monument Valley and Rainbow Bridge, into Canyon de Chelly and the Grand Canyon, across the high mesas of the Hopi, and to the pueblos and the villages along the Rio Grande. Their saga includes Boston’s Brahmins, the Greenwich Village avant-garde, the building of San Diego’s Balboa Park, and the birth of Santa Fe’s art and literary colony. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mary Mollie Pressler
THE WORLD WAR II LORDSBURG INTERNMENT/PRISONER OF WAR CAMP

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Conversations With the World

With a collection of slides, artifacts, and historical accounts, Mollie Pressler shares a multilayered overview of when the small town of Lordsburg became very big in the war effort. An Army camp built there would hold Japanese resident enemy aliens 1942-43, Italian prisoners of war 1943-44, and German prisoners of war 1944-45. One is taken back to the personal experiences of Americans on the home front, learning as well the effects of the situation on the prisoners. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Roberta Price
ACROSS THE DIVIDE: A Visual Journey Through Time and Space to the Communes of Northern New Mexico and Southern Colorado

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Conversations With the World

A slideshow and lecture about the utopian experiments that took root in New Mexico in the late 1960s and 1970 by someone who started out as an academic observer and became a observing participant. Price photographed communes in northern New Mexico and Southern Colorado from 1969-1977. The photos show houses and domes being constructed, community activities, gardening, commune schools, artwork and crafts, and vignettes of everyday life. The goal of the lecture is to increase understanding amongst New Mexicans who may be culturally, socially and economically in very different positions from the young people who grew up thinking the world was their oyster and that anything was possible. At the same time, Price refers and connects this era to earlier cultural, intellectual, and artistic movements in our history that shared some of the same ideals. In a sense the commune movement was the last gasp of Transcendentalism, and was very American after all. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Noel Pugach
HARRY S. TRUMAN
Chautauqua as Harry S. Truman

Series: American Icons

Compared to the "Great Roosevelt," whom he succeeded as thirty-third President of the United States, Harry S. Truman had undistinguished beginnings. Yet, by virtue of his direct style, earthy personality and willingness to make tough decisions, Truman left an indelible mark on the United States and the world. His decisions on the atomic bomb, Soviet-American relations, the Middle East, the Korean War, the firing of General Douglas MacArthur, and the Truman Doctrine, changed the world forever. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Noel Pugach
JOHN STEINBECK
Chautauqua as John Steinbeck

Series: Writers, Storytellers and Poets; American Icons

The vast literary output of John Steinbeck (1902-1968), one of America's Greatest writers of the twentieth century, is still read and studied today. "The Grapes of Wrath," "East of Eden," "Of Mice and Men," and many other novels are American classics. He also wrote numerous short stories and several screen plays. He is least known for his considerable work in journalism, with which he increasingly identified during the last twenty years of his life. This presentation brings to life one of America's premier writers. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Noel Pugach
LEW WALLACE
Chautauqua as Lew Wallace

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; American Icons

He is remembered as the author of "Ben Hur: A Tale of the Christ," but Lew Wallace (1827-1905) was also an Indiana lawyer and politician, Civil War general, and United States minister to the Ottoman Empire. As Territorial governor of New Mexico, he grappled with the Santa Fe Ring, the Lincoln County War, and Billy the Kid. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Sherry Robinson
APACHE VOICES

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Walk in the moccasins of the Apaches! Talks include an overview of Apache history, culture and values, followed by a choice of true stories, told in their own words. 1) Women warriors.Apaches used to say if a woman loved her husband, she would ride alongside him in battle. 2) Mescaleros� experience at the Bosque Redondo, the army's failed reservation for Navajos and Mescalero Apaches. 3) Lipan Apaches. When Coronado traversed the plains in search of gold, the first people he met outside the pueblos were Apache buffalo hunters. Their descendents would become Lipan Apaches. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Sherry Robinson
THE MYSTERY APACHES

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Apaches were living along the Pecos and Candian rivers long before the Spanish explorer Coronado entered the region in 1540. They've gotten little attention from historians, but they're every bit as interesting as Geronimo. Lipan Apaches, as well as groups of unnamed and unknown Apaches, continued to live in Eastern New Mexico and West Texas over hundreds of years. The Spaniards gave them various names, and American military officers, not knowing who they were, referred to them simply as "Apaches." When the Comanches drove other Apache groups from the buffalo plains, some held their ground for decades. Well into the 1800s the Pecos region was little known and unexplored. Even after the arrival of the U.S. Army, the Pecos provided refuge not only to the people who considered it their country but also to numbers of renegades, as the Army attempted to move tribes onto reservations. Who were these people? Several scholars have attempted to identify these shadowy groups. Sherry Robinson, in years of research on Eastern Apaches, will share her knowledge, which is based on the written record and Apache oral history. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Sherry Robinson
JAMES S. CALHOUN: New Mexico's First Territorial Governor

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

James Silas Calhoun was New Mexico Territory's first Indian agent and first territorial governor. Other than his correspondence as Indian agent, little is known about Calhoun. The Georgia native was active in Whig politics and in 1846, raised a company and jumped head first in the Mexican War, nearly riding his popularity to Congress. In 1849, President Zachary Taylor appointed Calhoun as Indian agent and in 1851, he was sworn in as the New Mexico Territory's first governor. He came to a New Mexico that was poor, isolated, and violent. Murders took place on Santa Fe Plaza, hostile tribes raided at will, not all New Mexicans were reconciled to being governed by outsiders, and Texas claimed a large sweep of land. Calhoun arrived at a critical time, as New Mexico transitioned from military occupation to civil government and began to think of itself as part of the United States. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Marie Romero Cash
SANTOS AND CHURCHES IN NORTHERN NEW MEXICO

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

This slide lecture will familiarize audiences with santos--what they are, who makes them and why. It will also map out colonial churches from the oldest U.S. Church, San Miguel Mission in Santa Fe, moving north to the much-photographed church at Ranchos de Taos. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Gabriel Sahd
ABE LINCOLN: The Making of a President
Chautauqua as Abraham Lincoln

Series: American Icons

Abraham Lincoln reminisces on his life, from the time of his birth until he was elected President of the United States. He experienced many tribulations as his family moved from frontier farm to frontier farm in the mid-west. As a young adult, he settled in New Salem, Illinois, penniless. He struggled to earn his livelihood, going from job to job. Soon, though, he entered politics and became a state legislator. In that position, he gained fame as a politician and a lawyer, not only within his state, but also at the national level, going on to lead the country during one of its most challenging times. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Gabriel Sahd
JOSÉ AARÓN LIBRADO GURULÉ: The Story of a Peón in New Mexico
Chautauqua as José Aarón Librado Gurulé

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

José Librado Gurulé, a 16-year-old peon from Placitas, became a wool drover for a wealthy patron of Bernalillo in an 1867 expedition from Santa Fe to Kansas City. His back-breaking labor, the hunger, danger and servitude, bring to light the horrors of peonage. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Gabriel Sahd
OSCAR HUBER: A Young Man Becomes Owner of a Madrid, a Coal Mining Town (1919-1954)
Chautauqua as Oscar Huber

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Hired by George A.Kaseman as Superintendent of Madrid coal mines, Oscar Huber was given free reign to operate. With little preparation for this role, he became a superb executive, far-sighted and talented. He loved beauty, justice, people and progress. Because of his leadership, Madrid coal mining production increased tremendously, bringing economic and social prosperity to the residents of Madrid. The town became world famous for its Fourth of July and Christmas celebrations. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Kenneth Seowtewa
NUESTRA SEÑORA DE GUADALUPE DE ZUNI MURALS

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Art, Music and Dance

The "Old Mission" of Zuni, listed on the state and national registries as one of the three oldest missions in New Mexico, dates back to 1629. The murals of Zuni deities were started in 1970 by Kenneth's father Alex Seowtewa, based on oral tradition of previous murals that were painted in fresco. Kenneth has been involved in the painting since 1977. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Kenneth Seowtewa
CULTURAL LIFE OF THE ZUNI NATION

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Explore the world of the A:Shiwi (Zuni), the most studied group of Native Americans, through the eyes of a man whose paternal and maternal ancestors held positions of authority through the centuries. Hear the true story of the fabled "Seven Cities of Gold" that Coronado was searching for in 1540. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Pamela Smith
PASSIONS IN PRINT: Two Centuries of New Mexico Private Press Lore

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

"Passions in Print" journeys across two centuries of literary history as it introduces the people of New Mexico's private press movement, their work and their tools. Beginning in the nineteenth century, this slide presentation focuses on a small group of independent artisan printers and publishers whose handcrafted books represent an extraordinary and little-known contribution to the literature of the region. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Dorothy Smoker
A UNIQUE DISCOVERY BY AN UNLIKELY COWBOY: The Remarkable Life of George McJunkin

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

History has a way of allowing elements to come together to reveal stories long silent: slavery, cowboy culture, ten thousand year old stone tools with extinct bison bones, and a disastrous flood. This is the story of the black cowboy, former slave, George McJunkin whose observations and inquisitive mind knew his discovery of "the bone pit" was something significant. His life is a dramatic example of self-education and accomplishment. It is even more amazing that he did this during the troubled post-Civil War period and became a respected member of a white community. Today, his name is permanently linked to one of the greatest archeological discoveries of the 20th Century in North America. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Dorothy Smoker
LAND OF LUZ: Maria de la Luz Beaubien Maxwell
Chautauqua as Maria de la Luz Beaubien Maxwell

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Luz Maxwell (1829-1900), tells her story from childhood in Taos to settling the Beaubien- Miranda Grant with her husband Lucien Maxwell. Her life is touched by Padre Martinez, Gov. Manuel Armijo, Kit Carson, Charles Fremont, the Bents, Gen. S.W. Kearny and others. She relates experiences during the Taos Rebellion, the Santa Fe Trail, the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, Indian attacks, the gold rush and land disputes. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Jake Spidle
LIFE AND DEATH (MOSTLY DEATH) IN NEW MEXICO 100 YEARS AGO

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Indians and barroom shootouts the Hollywood clichés of pioneer life, were far less a threat than domestic accidents and the humdrum medical problems associated with limited access to modern health care. On the other hand, there was a much-reduced threat of communicable disease. Systematically and entertainingly, such is the intention as this lecture compares mortality in the rough circumstances of pioneer New Mexico with that of the more well-established and stable parts of the country - with surprising results. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Stacia Spragg-Braude
THE CHURRO AND THE NAVAJO: One Family's Journey to Save the Sacred Sheep

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

The Navajo elders cried when they saw Sharon Begay bringing the sacred Churro sheep back to the reservation. They thought the "old time" sheep were gone forever. As children, they weaved the fleece and lived on the mutton. They also witnessed government forces slaughter their families' Churro to prevent over-grazing. This presentation features photographs and anecdotes documenting one Navajo family's journey to help save the Churro, and in the process, saving the family and Navajo culture. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Carole Sullivan
MADAME LIZZIE McGRATH: A Woman on Her Own
Chautauqua as Elizabeth

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

What was life like for women in the 19th Century American West? What opportunities were open to women? What rights did women have? What can we learn from the lives of women in the old west? Through a first person examination of the life of Mary Elizabeth “Lizzie” McGrath, a madame in Albuquerque from 1882-1920, many of these women’s issues are examined in an historical light. Lizzie McGrath was a colorful character whose life in Albuquerque, New Mexico is well documented. Her legend lived on through the McGrath's restaurant located in the downtown Hyatt until 2011. The "ghost of Lizzie" that inhabited this place is also well-known New Mexico lore. An intelligent and astute businesswoman, Lizzie was very financially successful. She regularly went to court to protect her property rights. She worked within the system at the time and believed her independence was her right. In this dramatization, what she saw in the 1880's, 1890's and the early 20th Century informs her observations on the women's liberation movement of yesterday and today. Her trail blazing independence is a significant addition to stories of women in the West. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Robert Torrez
VOICES FROM THE PAST

New Mexico's archives are an extraordinary resource. They contain thousands of documents that serve as "voices from the past," bringing three centuries of our history to life. These documents provide an endless source of stories that tell of brave New Mexicans who settled a vast frontier and of the conflicts and accommodations between the peoples who came into contact with each other during that process. This lecture can be tailored to the interest of your group. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Dr. Cipriano Vigil
RITUAL AND TRADITIONAL FOLK MUSIC AND SONG OF NORTHERN NEW MEXICO

Series: Art, Music and Dance

Cipriano Vigil, a native of Chamisal in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, is the living embodiment of nuevomexicano ritual music. As a boy, he learned from the previous generations of musicians at bailes (dances) and at entriegas, matrimonios y difuntos (christenings, marriages and funerals.) He takes you back to the encircling institutions where these village rituals bound families and neighbors together in responsibility for each other. His songs in the nueva cancion tradition (related to U.S. protest and labor songs) address poignant issues of today. His solo program is available through NMEH; a program with his family band is available directly through Dr. Vigil. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Jane Voss & Hoyle Osborne
ALL IN, DOWN AND OUT: The Great Depression in Song and Story

Series: Art, Music and Dance; Conversations With the World

The Great Depression inspired an amazing body of American popular and folk song. Woody Guthrie, Langston Hughes, Irving Berlin, Blind Alfred Reed, The Carter Family, E.Y. Harburg, Bessie Smith, and others gave us takes on many different aspects of the Depression. The songs are interwoven with readings from outstanding writers and wits of the day, as well as from ordinary working people. Stylistically authentic performances with piano and guitar. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Jane Voss & Hoyle Osborne
1912: A Musical Snapshot of America in the Year New Mexico Became a State

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures; Art, Music and Dance

New Mexico achieved statehood during a fascinating and complex time in America's history. The frontier was no longer open for expansion. The U.S. was becoming a major power in the world. New technologies like electric power, telephones, film, recordings, radio, automobiles, and airplanes were changing life in America. Minorities, women, and workers were all agitating for more rights. Songs are documents of American life which tell a lot about what ordinary people of the time found interesting, and how they felt about these developments. Voss & Osborne are expert performers and scholars of historic American music. They present songs from the suffrage movement and the labor struggles, about the tumultuous presidential election, and about the Titanic - all from 1912 - introduced with historical information, much of it drawn from journalism and literature of the period. The program's climax is the corrido, "Hymn to the Statehood of New Mexico." | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Jane Voss & Hoyle Osborne
I WANT TO BE BAD: The Flapper and Her Song
Chautauqua as Flapper

Series: Art, Music and Dance; Conversations With the World

Singer Jane Voss and pianist Hoyle Osborne give vivid, historically authentic readings of the songs of the women of the 1920s, the New Women, popularly known as "flappers." These fascinating and witty songs are remarkable artifacts of one of the greatest cultural shifts in American history, when women were establishing new roles for themselves and challenging conventions about costume, behavior, employment, sexuality, and expression. Quotations from journalists, poets, and the singers themselves complement the songs. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Edward Wallace
ESTEVAN THE BLACK: Journey into the Unknown
Chautauqua as Estevan the Moor

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

Estavan, a Moor and Spanish slave is given credit for being the first European to set foot in what is now the states of Texas, New Mexico, and Arizona. How he accomplished that feat is an all most unbelievable tale, filled with danger, adventure, and a date with Fate. Leaving Spain with his master and a company of 600 in 1527, he was stranded with three Spaniards in northern Mexico and began an adventure that included being captured and enslaved by Indians, wandering lost, being revered as a God, and meeting his fate at Zuni Pueblo. A remarkable story about a remarkable man. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Edward Wallace
FROM SLAVE TO SUPERSTAR: The Life of James Pierson Beckwourth
Chautauqua as Jim Beckwourth

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

An inspiring, entertaining, educational and historically accurate portrayal of one of our forgotten heroes. Edward Wallace uses his professional acting experience to bring to life the exploits of a truly remarkable and awe-inspiring character of our early western history. Jim Beckwourth, born a slave, went on to found Pueblo, Colorado, trap beaver with the likes of Kit Carson and Jim Bridger, and discover a pass over the Sierra Madre Mountains, which made it easier for immigrants traveling to California. His other exploits include owning a hotel in Santa Fe, running a trading post in Taos, and becoming Chief of the Mountain Crows. The audience is treated to an unforgettable and educational journey into our historical past. This program has elicited such comments as "The best Chautauqua program we have ever had," and, "Mr. Wallace's portrayal was truly mesmerizing." | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Mr. Allan Wheeler
WILLIAM BECKNELL (1786-1856): Founder of the Santa Fe Trail
Chautauqua as William Becknell

William Becknell was a trapper and explorer who founded the Santa Fe trail - on a quest to get money to pay off the debts that had landed him in debtors prison in Franklin, Missouri. After being bailed out of prison, he followed the directions of an old trapper and embarked on a arduous 77-day trek to Santa Fe. He returned to Franklin six months later and dropped $6,000 in silver coins on the ground of the town square for his creditors to pick up. Click here to open the William Becknell website in a new window. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Susi Wolf
STORYTELLING: Animal Tales and the Lessons They Teach Us

Series: Conversations With the World; Writers, Storytellers and Poets

Story is the oldest form of communication there is. From the earliest gatherings and etchings on cave walls, Story explained a culture for those who later passed that way. It is how First Mankind declared, “Hey, we were here and this is who we were!" Our brains are literally hardwired to understand facts, statistics, concepts and more through oral tradition. Story is the great connector between people and promotes an immediate bonding among listeners and the teller. There is both practical and transcendent power within the storytelling realm, which is explored in conversation. Didactic lesson is given through animal fables in an enjoyable and plausible method. Elements of the history of oral tradition invites a participatory aspect to the presentation. The program’s concentration is on animal and trickster stories from the U. S. Southwest, Mexico, Cherokee and Africa. Multiple tales will be shared, as well as Cherokee traditions and more. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Susi Wolf
THE SAGA OF DIAMOND BESSIE
Chautauqua as Diamond Bessie

Series: New Mexico History and Cultures

This colorful character comes to life with a zest worthy of true legends. Forced into a life of prostitution, Diamond Bessie becomes notorious and wealthy until her new husband brutally murders her. She reaches out from the grave and tells a cautionary tale that is applicable even in our modern society. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   

Ms. Susi Wolf
GRANDMARY THE VICTORIAN LADY: Life in the Victorian Parlor and the Suffrage Movement
Chautauqua as Grandmary

Series: Conversations With the World

Grandmary appears by virtue of "time travel" and tells stories from the late 19th century while giving etiquette lessons. She also shares valuable historical information by telling tales and showing some of her beloved and interesting Victorian possessions. Her shared knowledge of the Suffragette Movement is a fun and important lesson - the guests even wear an authentic Suffragette Sash and march in a Suffragette parade. A truly important historic component of Grandmary’s appearance is to experience the growth and trials of the Suffragette Movement through her eyes. In modern society, we often forget the debt owed these brave feminist pioneers. In Victorian times, life could be dismal for women who wanted to be part of business, sign contracts, vote, have child custody and more. There are so many interesting and accurate stories of the courage and cunning of these women who wore white sashes. | Full catalog entry and Chautauqua program application »

   
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who we are,
who we were
and who we aspire to be.

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