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Chester Nez: World War ll Navajo Code Talker

Chester Nez: World War ll Navajo Code Talker

Sat, Feb 24, 2018, 2:00pm - 3:00pm

Fuller Lodge Art Center, Central Avenue, Los Alamos, NM, USA

Although 420 Navajo code talkers served in the Marines during World War II, none had written memoirs until Nez's 2012 autobiography Code Talker. Chester Nez (1921-2014) was one of the original 29 code talkers, men who developed the only unbroken code in modern warfare and took it into battle against the Japanese. His life demonstrated how challenges enhance strength and how diversity augments the strength of a nation.

Judith Avila met the late Chester Nez in 2007 and realized he had a compelling story to tell. His memoir, written with Judith Avila, was published by Berkley Books in 2012.

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Ben Franklin Circles

Join a discussion exploring Franklin's 13 virtues

Ben Franklin Circle: Frugality

Thu, Mar 15, 2018, 6:00pm - 7:30pm

New Mexico Humanities Council, Silver Avenue Southeast, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Ben Franklin Circles meetings are dedicated to exploring the 13 virtues identified by Franklin: Temperance, Silence, Order, Resolution, Frugality, Industry, Sincerity, Justice, Moderation, Cleanliness, Tranquility, Chastity and Humility. Circle participants engage in conversations on what each of these virtues means today on both a personal and societal level. Toolkits and guidelines developed by 92Y, Hoover Institution and Citizen University are used to promote a meaningful discussion. 


To join the next Ben Franklin Circles conversation, call (505)633-7371. To learn more about this initiative, visit www.benfranklincircles.org.

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Fred Harvey's Southwest Couriers

All Aboard!

Tue, Mar 20, 2018, 2:00pm - 3:00pm

Ruidoso Public Library, Kansas City Road, Ruidoso, NM, United States

A new breed of courageous, intelligent, and hard-working women traveled west from the 1880’s as Harvey Girls, and then as Southwestern Detour Couriers from the 1920’s through the great depression. The railroads and the Fred Harvey system encouraged these young unmarried girls to head west to work for him, and become a part of the Southwestern landscape. The college-educated Detour Couriers, or Tour Guides, were a major part of the travel industry enlightening travelers about the history, and unique beauty of the entire southwest. Along with young men who drove the touring cars, and buses, these women took willing passengers off of the railroads and from the Fred Harvey Hotels to the ancient Indian Pueblos, National Parks (such as Bandelier, Carlsbad Caverns, and the Grand Canyon), and other places of interest. They were “walking-talking billboards” for the history, beauty and opportunities of the then little-known southwest. Grab your walking shoes, cameras, and a hat as we bump along the old dirt roads with VanAnn Moore to take a detour of the grand southwest!

 

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The Mystery Apaches

The Mystery Apaches

Tue, Mar 20, 2018, 6:00pm - 7:00pm

Roswell Public Library, North Pennsylvania Avenue, Roswell, NM, United States

Apaches were living along the Pecos and Canadian rivers long before the Spanish explorer Coronado entered the region in 1540. They've gotten little attention from historians, but they're every bit as interesting as Geronimo. Lipan Apaches, as well as groups of unnamed and unknown Apaches, continued to live in Eastern New Mexico and West Texas over hundreds of years. The Spaniards gave them various names, and American military officers, not knowing who they were, referred to them simply as "Apaches." When the Comanches drove other Apache groups from the buffalo plains, some held their ground for decades. Well into the 1800s the Pecos region was little known and unexplored. Even after the arrival of the U.S. Army, the Pecos provided refuge not only to the people who considered it their country but also to numbers of renegades, as the Army attempted to move tribes onto reservations. Who were these people? Several scholars have attempted to identify these shadowy groups. Sherry Robinson, in years of research on Eastern Apaches, will share her knowledge, which is based on the written record and Apache oral history.

Sherry Robinson is a long-time New Mexico journalist and author. Her book, "I Fought a Good Fight: A History of the Lipan Apaches", is the result of 12 years of research and describes Apaches living on the plains as well as their allies, the Lipans and Mescaleros.

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The US-Mexico Border: Place, Imagination, and Possibility

Acclaimed Border Exhibition at 516 ARTS

The US-Mexico Border Exhibition: 516 WORDS with Demetria Martinez, Denise Chavez & Mari Simba

Fri, Mar 30, 2018, 7:30pm - 9:30pm

Outpost Performance Space, Yale Boulevard Southeast, Albuquerque, NM, United States

516 ARTS, in partnership with Albuquerque Museum, presents The US-Mexico Border: Place, Imagination, and Possibility co-curated by Dr. Lowery Stokes Sims and Ana Elena Mallet. The group exhibition presents the work of over 40 designers and artists working along the US-Mexico border who are engaging with the intersections of culture that have developed in the region while considering the welfare and well-being of migrants and citizens who live there. This exhibition was originated at the Craft & Folk Art Museum in Los Angeles, where it was part of the Getty's Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA initiative and supported by major grants from the Getty Foundation.

The border has come to occupy an intellectual and an emotionally charged space as well as a territorial one. It exists within the geography of memory as much as being a place of transit and transformation. Much of the creative production around the border unearths ways in which artists, architects, designers and makers who live in border states negotiate two divided but interconnected realities. Although this exhibition was conceived before the topic of "building a wall" along the US-Mexico border re-merged in media headlines, its relevance is more potent and instructive than ever before.

The contemporary artists in this exhibition explore the border as a physical reality (place), as a subject (imagination), and as a site for production and forward thinking solutions (possibility). While the selection largely focuses on work executed in the last two decades, it also includes object by Chicano artists in California who came together in the 1970s and 1980s to address border issues in their work. The inclusion of artists from various disciplines, including design, architecture, sculpture, painting and photography, reflects the ways in which contemporary artists and designers themselves cross disciplinary borders.

 The exhibition runs January 27 - April 14.

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Calamity Jane Talks to Tourists

Calamity Jane Talks to Tourists

Sat, Apr 7, 2018, 11:30am - 12:30pm

26301 U.S. 70, Ruidoso Downs, NM, USA

Martha Cannary, aka Calamity Jane, as portrayed by Leslie Joy Coleman, was a well-known and significant historical figure who came to fame (or infamy) during the transition from the 'old west' to a more civilized time. She deeply resented the constraints that society placed on women. "Men had the power and they wanted control, but I wanted to control myself..." Judgmental writers have enjoyed casting stones, describing her as a drunken harridan, a disgrace to womankind. Defenders cite her kindness and maintain she managed to stay sober for periods of time when volunteering her services as an unpaid nurse. Even her most severe critics credit her with caring for miners quarantined during a Deadwood smallpox epidemic and for children or adults stricken with diphtheria, mountain fever and other diseases. Calamity was a product of the wild and woolly west. She was not immoral; but unmoral. With her upbringing, how could she be anything but unmoral. She was one of the frontier types and she had all the merits and most of their faults.

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The US-Mexico Border: Place, Imagination, and Possibility

Acclaimed Border Exhibition at 516 ARTS

The US-Mexico Border Exhibition: Guest Speaker Series with Journalists Maria Hinojosa & Simon Romero in Conversation

Fri, Apr 13, 2018, 7:00pm - 9:00pm

Kimo Theatre, Albuquerque, NM, United States

516 ARTS, in partnership with Albuquerque Museum, presents The US-Mexico Border: Place, Imagination, and Possibility co-curated by Dr. Lowery Stokes Sims and Ana Elena Mallet. The group exhibition presents the work of over 40 designers and artists working along the US-Mexico border who are engaging with the intersections of culture that have developed in the region while considering the welfare and well-being of migrants and citizens who live there. This exhibition was originated at the Craft & Folk Art Museum in Los Angeles, where it was part of the Getty's Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA initiative and supported by major grants from the Getty Foundation.

The border has come to occupy an intellectual and an emotionally charged space as well as a territorial one. It exists within the geography of memory as much as being a place of transit and transformation. Much of the creative production around the border unearths ways in which artists, architects, designers and makers who live in border states negotiate two divided but interconnected realities. Although this exhibition was conceived before the topic of "building a wall" along the US-Mexico border re-merged in media headlines, its relevance is more potent and instructive than ever before.

The contemporary artists in this exhibition explore the border as a physical reality (place), as a subject (imagination), and as a site for production and forward thinking solutions (possibility). While the selection largely focuses on work executed in the last two decades, it also includes object by Chicano artists in California who came together in the 1970s and 1980s to address border issues in their work. The inclusion of artists from various disciplines, including design, architecture, sculpture, painting and photography, reflects the ways in which contemporary artists and designers themselves cross disciplinary borders.

 The exhibition runs January 27 - April 14.

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Amazing Women of the Wild West: Territorial New Mexico

Amazing Women of the Wild West: Territorial New Mexico

Sat, Apr 14, 2018, 10:30am - 11:30am

Special Collections Library, Central Avenue Northeast, Albuquerque, NM, United States

One of the most dramatic eras of New Mexico’s rich history is the Territorial Period when the United States first raised the American flag on August 18, 1846 over the plaza of Santa Fe for the first time. VanAnn Moore examines territorial women through living history portrayals of Doña Tules (Gertrudes Barcelo), Susan Shelby Magoffin, and Lydia Spencer Lane. These women represented what it took to survive and thrive during very colorful and extremely challenging times in New Mexico’s Territorial Era. It brings history into an understandable and personal reality. Doña Tules opened Santa Fe and New Mexico to America; through Susan Magoffin’s detailed journal we understand the beginning of New Mexico as a Territory; and through Lydia Spencer Lane we experience frontier military life and the beginning of the American Civil War out West.

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Ben Franklin Circles

Join a discussion exploring Franklin's 13 virtues

Ben Franklin Circle: Industry

Thu, Apr 19, 2018, 6:00pm - 7:30pm

New Mexico Humanities Council, Silver Avenue Southeast, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Ben Franklin Circles meetings are dedicated to exploring the 13 virtues identified by Franklin: Temperance, Silence, Order, Resolution, Frugality, Industry, Sincerity, Justice, Moderation, Cleanliness, Tranquility, Chastity and Humility. Circle participants engage in conversations on what each of these virtues means today on both a personal and societal level. Toolkits and guidelines developed by 92Y, Hoover Institution and Citizen University are used to promote a meaningful discussion. 


To join the next Ben Franklin Circles conversation, call (505)633-7371. To learn more about this initiative, visit www.benfranklincircles.org.

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Ben Franklin Circles

Join a discussion exploring Franklin's 13 virtues

Ben Franklin Circles: Sincerity

Thu, May 17, 2018, 6:00pm - 7:30pm

New Mexico Humanities Council, Silver Avenue Southeast, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Ben Franklin Circles meetings are dedicated to exploring the 13 virtues identified by Franklin: Temperance, Silence, Order, Resolution, Frugality, Industry, Sincerity, Justice, Moderation, Cleanliness, Tranquility, Chastity and Humility. Circle participants engage in conversations on what each of these virtues means today on both a personal and societal level. Toolkits and guidelines developed by 92Y, Hoover Institution and Citizen University are used to promote a meaningful discussion. 


To join the next Ben Franklin Circles conversation, call (505)633-7371. To learn more about this initiative, visit www.benfranklincircles.org.

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Ben Franklin Circles

Join a discussion exploring Franklin's 13 virtues

Ben Franklin Circles: Justice

Thu, Jun 21, 2018, 6:00pm - 7:30pm

New Mexico Humanities Council, Silver Avenue Southeast, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Ben Franklin Circles meetings are dedicated to exploring the 13 virtues identified by Franklin: Temperance, Silence, Order, Resolution, Frugality, Industry, Sincerity, Justice, Moderation, Cleanliness, Tranquility, Chastity and Humility. Circle participants engage in conversations on what each of these virtues means today on both a personal and societal level. Toolkits and guidelines developed by 92Y, Hoover Institution and Citizen University are used to promote a meaningful discussion. 


To join the next Ben Franklin Circles conversation, call (505)633-7371. To learn more about this initiative, visit www.benfranklincircles.org.

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Music from the Ranch and Open Range

Music from the Ranch and Open Range

Sat, Jun 30, 2018, 2:00pm - 3:00pm

Esther Bone Memorial Library, Pinetree Road Southeast, Rio Rancho, NM, United States

Cowboy music has evolved from the open range and ranch employees who worked and rode after cattle during the late 19th and early to mid 20th century. These include songs written by ranch hands about horses, cattle and lost love. Others add death and the devil to the story. But all have in common the expression of what ranch and farm work was like during this time. Steve Cormier performs these and also songs he has written, reflecting his years as a ranch and farm hand.

Steve Cormier earned a Ph.D. in American Studies from the University of New Mexico, with a dissertation on twentieth century New Mexico ranching. From 1979 to 1988, he worked on ranches and farms in the Flint Hills of Kansas and around Santa Rosa and Fort Sumner, NM. His music derives from that experience. 

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The Churro and the Navajo: One Family's Journey to Save the Sacred Sheep

The Churro and the Navajo: One Family's Journey to Save the Sacred Sheep

Thu, Jul 12, 2018, 7:00pm - 8:00pm

New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum, Dripping Springs Road, Las Cruces, NM, United States

The Navajo elders cried when they saw Sharon Begay bringing the sacred Churro sheep back to the reservation. They thought the "old time" sheep were gone forever. As children, they weaved the fleece and lived on the mutton. They also witnessed government forces slaughter their families' Churro to prevent over-grazing. Stacia Spragg-
Braude's presentation features photographs and anecdotes documenting one Navajo family's journey to help save the Churro, and in the process, saving the family and Navajo culture.

Stacia Spragg-Braud is a photographer mainly interested in families and communities struggling to maintain cultural identity. She is a former newspaper photographer and has covered projects in the Balkans, Cuba and Uganda, including an extensive project on Bulgarian Gypsies. She is the author of "To Walk in Beauty: A Navajo Family's Journey Home." 

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Storytelling Theatre with Live Music

Storytelling Theatre with Live Music

Thu, Jul 19, 2018, 10:00am - 11:00am

Farmington Public Library, 1825 19th St, Farmington, NM 87401, USA

Johanna Hongell-Darsee; storyteller, dancer, mime; and Scott Darsee, guitarist, composer take you on a journey of stories. The art of storytelling is universal and as ancient as humanity; our dreams of a distant common past. In this presentation we tell stories using music, song, masks, dance and mime. Stories travel and have always traveled. On their way they pick up bits and pieces of different cultures and landscapes but the heroes and heroines, the villains and the mysterious creatures often stay familiar.

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Storytelling Theatre with Live Music

Stortytelling Theatre with Live Music

Thu, Jul 19, 2018, 3:00pm - 4:00pm

Farmington Public Library, 2101 Farmington Ave, Farmington, NM 87401, USA

Johanna Hongell-Darsee; storyteller, dancer, mime; and Scott Darsee, guitarist, composer take you on a journey of stories. The art of storytelling is universal and as ancient as humanity; our dreams of a distant common past. In this presentation we tell stories using music, song, masks, dance and mime. Stories travel and have always traveled. On their way they pick up bits and pieces of different cultures and landscapes but the heroes and heroines, the villains and the mysterious creatures often stay familiar.

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Ben Franklin Circles

Join a discussion exploring Franklin's 13 virtues

Ben Franklin Circles: Moderation

Thu, Jul 19, 2018, 6:00pm - 7:30pm

New Mexico Humanities Council, Silver Avenue Southeast, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Ben Franklin Circles meetings are dedicated to exploring the 13 virtues identified by Franklin: Temperance, Silence, Order, Resolution, Frugality, Industry, Sincerity, Justice, Moderation, Cleanliness, Tranquility, Chastity and Humility. Circle participants engage in conversations on what each of these virtues means today on both a personal and societal level. Toolkits and guidelines developed by 92Y, Hoover Institution and Citizen University are used to promote a meaningful discussion. 


To join the next Ben Franklin Circles conversation, call (505)633-7371. To learn more about this initiative, visit www.benfranklincircles.org.

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Ben Franklin Circles

Join a discussion exploring Franklin's 13 virtues

Ben Franklin Circles: Cleanliness

Thu, Aug 16, 2018, 6:00pm - 7:30pm

New Mexico Humanities Council, Silver Avenue Southeast, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Ben Franklin Circles meetings are dedicated to exploring the 13 virtues identified by Franklin: Temperance, Silence, Order, Resolution, Frugality, Industry, Sincerity, Justice, Moderation, Cleanliness, Tranquility, Chastity and Humility. Circle participants engage in conversations on what each of these virtues means today on both a personal and societal level. Toolkits and guidelines developed by 92Y, Hoover Institution and Citizen University are used to promote a meaningful discussion. 


To join the next Ben Franklin Circles conversation, call (505)633-7371. To learn more about this initiative, visit www.benfranklincircles.org.

add to calendar

 

Ben Franklin Circles

Join a discussion exploring Franklin's 13 virtues

Ben Franklin Circles: Chastity

Thu, Sep 20, 2018, 6:00pm - 7:30pm

New Mexico Humanities Council, Silver Avenue Southeast, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Ben Franklin Circles meetings are dedicated to exploring the 13 virtues identified by Franklin: Temperance, Silence, Order, Resolution, Frugality, Industry, Sincerity, Justice, Moderation, Cleanliness, Tranquility, Chastity and Humility. Circle participants engage in conversations on what each of these virtues means today on both a personal and societal level. Toolkits and guidelines developed by 92Y, Hoover Institution and Citizen University are used to promote a meaningful discussion. 


To join the next Ben Franklin Circles conversation, call (505)633-7371. To learn more about this initiative, visit www.benfranklincircles.org.

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Madame Lizzie McGrath: A Woman on Her Own

Madame Lizzie McGrath: A Woman on Her Own

Thu, Sep 20, 2018, 7:00pm - 8:00pm

Fort Union National Monument, New Mexico 161, Watrous, NM, United States

What was life like for women in the 19th Century American West? What opportunities were open to women? What rights did women have? What can we learn from the lives of women in the old west? Through a first person examination of the life of Mary Elizabeth “Lizzie” McGrath, a madame in Albuquerque from 1882-1920, many of these women’s issues are examined in an historical light. Lizzie McGrath was a colorful character whose life in Albuquerque, New Mexico is well documented. Her legend lived on through the McGrath's restaurant located in the downtown Hyatt until 2011. The "ghost of Lizzie" that inhabited this place is also well-known New Mexico lore. An intelligent and astute businesswoman, Lizzie was very financially successful. She regularly went to court to protect her property rights. She worked within the system at the time and believed her independence was her right. In this dramatization by Carole Sullivan, what she saw in the 1880's, 1890's and the early 20th Century informs her observations on the women's liberation movement of yesterday and today. Her trail blazing independence is a significant addition to stories of women in the West.

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Noel Pugach Presents Lew Wallace in Santa Fe

Lew Wallace

Thu, Oct 4, 2018, 1:00pm - 2:00pm

Renesan Institute For Lifelong, Old Pecos Trail, Santa Fe, NM, United States

He is remembered as the author of "Ben Hur: A Tale of the Christ," but Lew Wallace (1827-1905) was also an Indiana lawyer and politician, Civil War general, and United States minister to the Ottoman Empire. As Territorial governor of New Mexico, he grappled with the Santa Fe Ring, the Lincoln County War, and Billy the Kid.

Noel H. Pugach is a Professor of History at the University of New Mexico. He is the author of numerous books and articles on American foreign relations.

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Land Grants and Water Rights: Fighting Words in the Twenty-First Century?

Land Grants and Water Rights: Fighting Words in the Twenty-First Century?

Thu, Oct 11, 2018, 1:00pm - 2:00pm

New Mexico Farm and Ranch Heritage Museum, Dripping Springs Road, Las Cruces, NM, United States

Land grants and water rights have been an integral part of New Mexico's history. The subject of intense debates, long and arduous discussions and disagreements, court rulings and legislation, land grant and acequia rights remain an ongoing issue in New Mexico today. Dr. Stephanie Beninato addresses the cultural, social, economic and political history as well as jurisprudence.

Dr. Stefanie Beninato is a long-time public historian, working on projects ranging from archaeological surveys to genealogy, land use and water law. 

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Ben Franklin Circles

Join a discussion exploring Franklin's 13 virtues

Ben Franklin Circles: Tranquility

Thu, Oct 18, 2018, 6:00pm - 7:30pm

New Mexico Humanities Council, Silver Avenue Southeast, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Ben Franklin Circles meetings are dedicated to exploring the 13 virtues identified by Franklin: Temperance, Silence, Order, Resolution, Frugality, Industry, Sincerity, Justice, Moderation, Cleanliness, Tranquility, Chastity and Humility. Circle participants engage in conversations on what each of these virtues means today on both a personal and societal level. Toolkits and guidelines developed by 92Y, Hoover Institution and Citizen University are used to promote a meaningful discussion. 


To join the next Ben Franklin Circles conversation, call (505)633-7371. To learn more about this initiative, visit www.benfranklincircles.org.

add to calendar

 

Ben Franklin Circles

Join a discussion exploring Franklin's 13 virtues

Ben Franklin Circles: Humility

Thu, Nov 15, 2018, 6:00pm - 7:30pm

New Mexico Humanities Council, Silver Avenue Southeast, Albuquerque, NM, USA

Ben Franklin Circles meetings are dedicated to exploring the 13 virtues identified by Franklin: Temperance, Silence, Order, Resolution, Frugality, Industry, Sincerity, Justice, Moderation, Cleanliness, Tranquility, Chastity and Humility. Circle participants engage in conversations on what each of these virtues means today on both a personal and societal level. Toolkits and guidelines developed by 92Y, Hoover Institution and Citizen University are used to promote a meaningful discussion. 


To join the next Ben Franklin Circles conversation, call (505)633-7371. To learn more about this initiative, visit www.benfranklincircles.org.

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A Fork in the Road: J. Robert Oppenheimer and the Cold War

A Fork in the Road: J. Robert Oppenheimer and the Cold War

Sun, Nov 18, 2018, 2:00pm - 3:00pm

Sandoval County Historical, Edmund Road, Bernalillo, NM, United States

Jon Hunner, Director of the Public History Program at the New Mexico State University, explores how J. Robert Oppenheimer, the director of the Los Alamos lab that created the atomic bomb for the Manhattan Project, participated in the post war policy-making which helped direct the nascent nuclear weapons program of the nation. "Oppie" was a key figure in the U.S. nuclear weapons program from 1945 to 1954 as he chaired important governmental committees. He also was a public intellectual who wrote and lectured about the Atomic Age and nuclear science across the country and internationally. In the early 1950s, he was subjected to a security clearance procedure that revoked his top secret clearance and removed his influence from nuclear policy making. His hearing is an interesting event that showed the tenor of the Red Scare of the times, a fascinating example of the contested relationship between science and society in regards to nuclear weapons, public policy, and the Cold War.

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