Divine Union, Courtesy of the Museum Collection

Divine Union, Courtesy of the Museum Collection

Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest

Sat, Nov 11, 2017, 12:00pm

At a time when concerts and gatherings on the West Coast gave birth to 1967's infamous "Summer of Love," New Mexico was experiencing its own social and environmental revolution depicted in Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest, an exhibition curated by Jack Loeffler and Meredith Davidson. 

 

The exhibition spans the decades of the 60s and 70s exploring this influx of young people to New Mexico and the subsequent collision of cultures. Through archival footage, oral histories, photography, ephemera and artifacts, the exhibition examines this cultural revolution and asks how these forms of rebellion inform the ways we think about contemporary social and political questions of what it means to be an engaged citizen.

 

Gallery talks occur monthly for the duration of the exhibit. 

 

The exhibit runs through February 11, 2018 at the New Mexico History Museum in Santa Fe. For more information, visit www.nmhistorymuseum.org

Lama Community
Gallery talk with Siddiq Hans von Breisen

Sat, Nov 11, 2017, 12:00pm - 1:00pm

113 Lincoln Avenue, Santa Fe, NM, United States

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Counterculture, the Rise of Permaculture
Gallery talk with Roxanne Swentzell

Sat, Dec 9, 2017, 12:00pm - 1:00pm

113 Lincoln Avenue, Santa Fe, NM, United States

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La Academia de la Nueva Raza
Gallery talk with historian Enrique Lamadrid

Sat, Jan 13, 2018, 12:00pm - 1:00pm

113 Lincoln Avenue, Santa Fe, NM, United States

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The Art of the Poster
Gallery talk with Dennis Larkins

Sat, Feb 10, 2018, 12:00pm - 1:00pm

113 Lincoln Avenue, Santa Fe, NM, United States

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QUERENCIA: Rituals of the Río Arriba

29 Dec 2017

“Querer means to want, to desire, to be in a place, with its people. In folk terminology, querencia is such a place, the center space of desire, the root of belonging and yearning to belong, that vicinity where you first beheld the light. Querencia, in collective terms, is homeland.” ~Enrique Lamadrid, Nuevo México Profundo.

Miguel Gandert tells stories. He tells stories of his homeland, New Mexico (and beyond), its people and the cultural practices that distinguish communities from each other while simultaneously revealing their kinship. You will have to form your own words, however. Gandert’s stories are told through penetrating, black and white photos. A primary focus of his work is his own mestizaje heritage and the fusion and tension of the relationship between Spanish Colonial and Native Cultures of the Americas.

Miguel Gandert, a native of Espanola, NM, is an award-winning documentary and fine-art photographer and filmmaker. His photographs have been shown in galleries and museums throughout the world and are in numerous public collections including the Smithsonian Museum of American Art, the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, the National Museum of American History and Art at the Smithsonian, and the Center for Creative Photography in Tucson, the Beinke Rare Book and Manuscript Collection at Yale, and the Museum of Fine Arts in Santa Fe.

The exhibit runs October 6 - December 29, 2017 at the New Mexico Humanities Council. 

Johanna and Scott Hongell-Darsee

Johanna and Scott Hongell-Darsee

Storytelling Theatre with Live Music

Tue, Dec 19, 2017, 7:00pm

Johanna Hongell-Darsee; storyteller, dancer, mime; and Scott Darsee, guitarist, composer take you on a journey of stories. The art of storytelling is universal and as ancient as humanity; our dreams of a distant common past. In this presentation we tell stories using music, song, masks, dance and mime. Stories travel and have always traveled. On their way they pick up bits and pieces of different cultures and landscapes but the heroes and heroines, the villains and the mysterious creatures often stay familiar.

Storytelling Theatre with Live Music

Tue, Dec 19, 2017, 7:00pm - 8:00pm

Ocotillo Performing Arts Center, w 88210, 310 W Main St, Artesia, NM 88210, USA

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Noel Pugach presents Lew Wallace

Sat, Dec 9, 2017, 2:00pm

He is remembered as the author of "Ben Hur: A Tale of the Christ," but Lew Wallace (1827-1905) was also an Indiana lawyer and politician, Civil War general, and United States minister to the Ottoman Empire. As Territorial governor of New Mexico, he grappled with the Santa Fe Ring, the Lincoln County War, and Billy the Kid.

Lew Wallace

Sat, Dec 9, 2017, 2:00pm - 3:00pm

Cerrillos Hills State Park, County Road 59, Santa Fe, NM, United States

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Andy Mason

Andy Mason

A Brief History of Christmas Music

Wed, Dec 6, 2017, 6:30pm

Who wrote the 12 Days of Christmas? Why is Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer so popular? Who sang Rockin' Around the Christmas Tree? What was the first Christmas song to be performed in outer space? Did Frosty the Snowman really come to life? And, why do we love holiday music so much? From 16th century West Country English Christmas carols to Christmas music from the new millennium and EVERYTHING in between, Andy Mason will present fascinating Christmas history and trivia through music.

A Brief History of Christmas Music

Wed, Dec 6, 2017, 6:30pm - 7:30pm

Lomas-Tramway Public Library, 908 Eastridge Dr NE, Albuquerque, NM 87123, USA

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A Brief History of Christmas Music

Thu, Dec 14, 2017, 1:00pm - 2:00pm

Pueblo Auditorium, 300 N Kentucky Ave, Roswell, NM 88201

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A Brief History of Christmas Music

Sat, Dec 16, 2017, 11:00am - 12:00pm

Silver City Public Library, 515 W College Ave, Silver City, NM 88061, USA

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A Brief History of Christmas Music

Sun, Dec 17, 2017, 3:00pm - 4:00pm

Taylor Ranch Library, 5700 Bogart St NW, Albuquerque, NM 87120, USA

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Jon Hunner

Jon Hunner

A Fork in the Road: J. Robert Oppenheimer and the Cold War

Sat, Nov 18, 2017, 2:00pm

Jon Hunner, Director of the Public History Program at the New Mexico State University, explores how J. Robert Oppenheimer, the director of the Los Alamos lab that created the atomic bomb for the Manhattan Project, participated in the post war policy-making which helped direct the nascent nuclear weapons program of the nation. "Oppie" was a key figure in the U.S. nuclear weapons program from 1945 to 1954 as he chaired important governmental committees. He also was a public intellectual who wrote and lectured about the Atomic Age and nuclear science across the country and internationally. In the early 1950s, he was subjected to a security clearance procedure that revoked his top secret clearance and removed his influence from nuclear policy making. His hearing is an interesting event that showed the tenor of the Red Scare of the times, a fascinating example of the contested relationship between science and society in regards to nuclear weapons, public policy, and the Cold War.

A Fork in the Road: J. Robert Oppenheimer and the Cold War

Sat, Nov 18, 2017, 2:00pm - 3:00pm

DeLavy House, 151 Edmond Rd, Bernalillo, NM

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Arnold Herrera Drums

Arnold Herrera Drums

Arnold Herrera of Cochiti Pueblo presents

The Way of the Drum

Fri, Nov 17, 2017, 2:30pm

Arnold Herrera presents a way into the Cochiti Pueblo world told from personal experiences, traditional stories and teachings. While demonstrating steps in constructing the famous Cochiti drum, Mr. Herrera tells about tribal political structures, language, ceremony, clans and moiety membership, roles of men, women and children, and modern Pueblo social problems. This journey covers the period from the 1940s to the present.

The Way of the Drum

Fri, Nov 17, 2017, 2:30pm - 3:30pm

Santa Fe Children's Museum, 1050 Old Pecos Trail, Santa Fe, NM 87505, USA

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Courtesy International Studies Institute

Courtesy International Studies Institute

LECTURE SERIES

Slow Work: Time and Life in the Digital Age 

Mon, Oct 30, 2017, 5:30pm

Both infinite and fleeting, time defines all aspects of human existence, from the way we learn, work and play to how we govern. But since the dawn of the digital age, technology is revolutionizing the way we measure time and by consequence the way we live. This year's International Studies Institute Public Lecture Series is dedicated to examining the intersection of human existence and technology's capacity to redefine the meaning of both space and time in the context of life and work.

MORE INFORMATION

China's Great Global Leap: Mao's Socialist Revolution
Speaker: Dr. Matt Galway, University of California-Berkley

Mon, Oct 30, 2017, 5:30pm - 6:45pm

University of New Mexico, Ortega Hall #335, Albuquerque, NM

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Waiting on Forgiveness: The Slow Work of Forbearance Activism in Iran (and Methodological Reflections)
Speaker: Dr. Arzoo

Mon, Nov 6, 2017, 5:30pm - 6:45pm

University of New Mexico, Ortega Hall #335, Albuquerque, NM

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Hearing Slowly: Meaning in the Time of Soundbites
Speaker: Dr. Karmen MacKendrick, Le Moyne College

Mon, Nov 13, 2017, 5:30pm - 6:45pm

University of New Mexico, Ortega Hall #335, Albuquerque, NM

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Cross Pollination

Cross Pollination

Cross Pollination Exhibit

Sat, Aug 19, 2017, 10:00am

Pollinators, particularly bees, have become increasingly threatened by human action. Cross Pollination refers not only to how insects pollinate a large portion of the world's food supply, but also to the cross pollination of ideas in art and science, and highlights 17 artists that have chosen to raise awareness about this particular aspect of our endangered ecosystem. 

For more information, call (505)242-1445.

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Cross Pollination Exhibit

Sat, Aug 19, 2017, 10:00am - Sat, Nov 11, 2017, 5:00pm

516 ARTS, Central Avenue Southwest, Albuquerque, NM, United States

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Stephanie Beninato

Stephanie Beninato

Popé and Naranjo: Leadership in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680

Tue, Nov 7, 2017, 6:00pm

Was Popé the leader of the Pueblo Revolt?  Were there other leaders?  Until recently, with few exceptions, historians left this question unstudied.  Stephanie Beninato will examine the documents within a cooperative model of Pueblo leadership so we can appreciate this event and its enormous consequences on the cultural landscape of New Mexico.

Popé and Naranjo: Leadership in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680

Tue, Nov 7, 2017, 6:00pm - 7:00pm

Octavia Fellin Public Library, West Hill Avenue, Gallup, NM, United States

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Jack Loeffler

Jack Loeffler

Jack Loeffler presents Adventures with Ed

Sun, Nov 5, 2017, 2:00pm

Jack Loeffler discusses the life of environmental anarchist Edward Abbey and includes readings from Loeffler's biographical memoir of his late best friend. Together, Abbey and Loeffler ranged the American Southwest engaged in a conversation that lasted for decades. Loeffler recalls some adventures and speaks of the complex points of view that led Abbey to launch the radical environmental movement.

Adventures with Ed

Sun, Nov 5, 2017, 2:00pm - 3:00pm

Village of Tijeras Historic Church

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Judith Avila

Judith Avila

Chester Nez: World War II Navajo Code Talker

Sun, Nov 5, 2017, 2:00pm

Although 420 Navajo code talkers served in the Marines during World War II, none had written memoirs until Nez's 2012 autobiography Code Talker, co-written with Judith Avila. Chester Nez (1921-2014) was one of the original 29 code talkers, men who developed the only unbroken code in modern warfare and took it into battle against the Japanese. His life demonstrated how challenges enhance strength and how diversity augments the strength of a nation.

Chester Nez: World War II Navajo Code Talker

Sun, Nov 5, 2017, 2:00pm - 3:00pm

San Ysidro Church, Corrales Road, Corrales, NM, United States

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Voss & Osborne

Voss & Osborne

Jane Voss & Hoyle Osborne present I Want to Be Bad: The Flapper and Her Song

Sat, Nov 4, 2017, 11:30am

Singer Jane Voss and pianist Hoyle Osborne give vivid, historically authentic readings of the songs of the women of the 1920s, the New Women, popularly known as "flappers." These fascinating and witty songs are remarkable artifacts of one of the greatest cultural shifts in American history, when women were establishing new roles for themselves and challenging conventions about costume, behavior, employment, sexuality, and expression. Quotations from journalists, poets, and the singers themselves complement the songs.

I Want to Be Bad: The Flapper and Her Song

Sat, Nov 4, 2017, 11:30am - 12:30pm

Farmington Museum, 3041 E Main St, Farmington, NM 87402, USA

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NMHC Welcomes New Executive Director, Dr. Brandon L. Johnson

31 Oct 2017

The New Mexico Humanities Council (NMHC) announces the appointment of Dr. Brandon L. Johnson as its new Executive Director.

“The Council is fortunate to have Dr. Johnson as the new Executive Director. Our national search yielded an impressive field of candidates, all with measures of experience, expertise, and commitment to the humanities,” said NMHC Board Chair, Doris Fields. “Brandon brings not only knowledge and skill but also great passion to the New Mexico humanities community.”

Dr. Johnson discovered a passion for humanities administration and programming while pursuing a doctorate in history at the University of Chicago. This led him back to Utah, his home state, as the Utah Humanities Council (UHC) Director of Grants and Historical Programs. While there, he expanded grant opportunities, created an award-winning program in support of Utah's cultural institutions and developed a radio program to raise awareness about UHC across the state. In 2009, he transitioned to Washington D.C. as the Senior Program Officer in the Office of Challenge Grants at the National Endowment for the Humanities. In this position, he was instrumental in updating the grant system to support under-served communities.

"I’m thrilled to join the New Mexico Humanities Council as its Executive Director,” Johnson said. “Looking forward to our fiftieth anniversary, we intend to take our programs to the next level and provide New Mexicans with fresh humanities experiences. No other state can hold a candle to New Mexico’s richly diverse heritage. Our foodways, art, stories, architecture, and communities are unmatched, and we want to help the state’s residents find new ways to talk about them.” 

Johnson succeeds Dr. Craig Newbill who retired from NMHC in January after 24 years of forging important partnerships, developing engaging humanities programs and rousing support for the humanities throughout the state.

Susi Wolf

Susi Wolf

Susi Wolf presents Storytelling: Animal Tales and the Lessons They Teach Us

Thu, Oct 26, 2017, 10:00am

Story is the oldest form of communication there is. From the earliest gatherings and etchings on cave walls, Story explained a culture for those who later passed that way. Our brains are literally hardwired to understand facts, statistics, concepts and more through oral tradition. Story is the great connector between people and promotes an immediate bonding among listeners and the teller. The program’s concentration is on animal and trickster stories from the U. S. Southwest, Mexico, Cherokee and Africa. Multiple tales will be shared, as well as Cherokee traditions and more.

Stortytelling: Animal Tales and the Lessons They Teach Us

Thu, Oct 26, 2017, 10:00am - 11:00am

Bear Canyon Estates, 4440 Morris Street Northeast, Albuquerque, NM 87111, United States

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Steve Dixon as James Ohio Pattie

Steve Dixon as James Ohio Pattie

Trapping and Trekking with James Ohio Pattie

22 Oct 2017

Come along with James Ohio Pattie, portrayed by Steve Dixon, as he encounters the native plants, animals and peoples of New Mexico. Endure the hardships and unforeseen dangers while traveling through the prairies, deserts, mountains and valleys. View the world through the wide eyes of a mountain man whose words paint pictures in the minds of those who huddle around his campfire in 1824.

Bob Julyan

Bob Julyan

Bob Julyan Presents The Place Names of New Mexico

21 Oct 2017

Sangre de Cristo, Custer Mountain, Chi-chil-tah, Mogollon- such intriguing names, rich with anecdotes and folklore. But place names also offer unique insights into the history and values of the state's peoples. With humor and local examples tailored to your locale, Bob Julyan gives audiences a lively names tour of the New Mexico landscape.

Sherri Burr

Sherri Burr

Race and Racism in the New Millenium

21 Oct 2017

As the domestic and international economy evolves, so too has the discriminatory impact of unconscious bias. Burr uses studies on shopping for cars and mortgages, participating in music competitions, and searching for jobs using phantom resumes to show that while the law has eliminated conscious discrimination against African-Americans, Hispanics, Native Americans and others, these groups continue to be harmed at a more insidious, unconscious level. The surprising revelation is that group members sometimes discriminate against each other.

Sherri Burr, a graduate of Yale Law School, is the Dickason Professor of Law at the University of New Mexico where she has taught for over 17 years. She is the author of three published books.

M. Jimmie Killingsworth

M. Jimmie Killingsworth

Nuclear New Mexico

20 Oct 2017

First there was eco-tourism. Now there’s nuclear tourism. The two have more in common than you might think. When the first bomb exploded at Trinity Site, and Robert Oppenheimer invoked the famous phrase “destroyer of worlds,” the destiny of the environmental movement—“saving the planet”—also sprang into being. The power to destroy and the power to save the earth, once allotted to the gods, fell into human hands for the first time in history. Now for every site of interest in nuclear history, there’s a corresponding site of natural preservation—Trinity Site alongside the Bosque del Apache, Los Alamos bordering Bandelier National Monument, the WIPP site paired with Carlsbad Caverns. The New Mexico landscape reflects the double image of modern humanity as destroyer and savior of the planet. This presentation by M. Jimmie Killingsworth offers a meditation on the new status of humanity.

This program is free and open to the public. For more information, call 505-334-9325.

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From Days of Infamy to Days of Remembrance: A Japanese American Journey

Thu, Nov 2, 2017, 6:00pm

From Days of Infamy to Days of Remembrance: A Japanese American Journey commemorates the 75th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066, which authorized the unlawful removal and incarceration of 120,000 women, men, and children of Japanese ancestry during WWII. The Japanese American Citizens League Players reenact stories of immigration, internment, and the post-war recovery of three generations of Japanese Americans. Tributes to local Japanese Americans of "the Greatest Generation," who endured racial discrimination, survived the Great Depression and WWII internment camps, and distinguished themselves as Americans and New Mexicans are included in the program.

 

For more information, contact Dr. Nikki Nojima Louis, New Mexico Japanese American Citizens League, louisnikki9@gmail.com

From Days of Infamy to Days of Remembrance

Thu, Nov 2, 2017, 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Santa Fe Community College, 6401 Richards Ave, Santa Fe, NM 87508, United States

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From Days of Infamy to Days of Remembrance

Sat, Dec 9, 2017, 10:30am - 12:00pm

Special Collections Library, Central Avenue Northeast, Albuquerque, NM, United States

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Silver City Museum

Silver City Museum

Fifty Years Ago in Silver City Community Panel Discussion

12 Oct 2017

The era that saw the Silver City Museum established also saw the destruction of the brothels by local law enforcement. Thomas Ryan was the Silver City police chief in 1967 and oversaw the destruction of the brothels. Ernest Gomez, a police officer of that era, and Chief Ryan will discuss policing and crime 50 years ago in Silver City. Bobbie Neal was
born in the Ailman house, now the Silver City Museum, when her father was the fire chief. She knew brothel owner Madame Millie and will provide the citizen side of the story about policing and crime circa 1967.

For more information, call (575)388-1076.

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Diana Molina

Diana Molina

Morena Moderna, Contemporary Visions of Our Lady of Guadalupe

7 Oct 2017

As a modern symbol of empowerment, La Virgen de Guadalupe inspires an impassioned and universal fervor. In a multi-faceted photographic portrayal, presented by Diana Molina, a panorama of vibrant imagery embodies the spirit of the popular symbol of heritage in a contemporary cultural context. A journey that spans transnational borders, visits traditional celebrations and depicts the icon's integration within the media, commercialism and politics of the day.

This program is free and open to the public. Entrance fees may apply. For more information, call (505)757-7241.

Susi Wolf

Susi Wolf

Storytelling with Susi Wolf

26 Sep 2017

Story is the oldest form of communication there is. From the earliest gatherings and etchings on cave walls, Story explained a culture for those who later passed that way. Story is the great connector between people and promotes an immediate bonding among listeners and the teller. There is both practical and transcendent power within the storytelling realm, which is explored in conversation. Susi Wolf's program concentrates on animal and trickster stories from the U. S. Southwest, Mexico, Cherokee and Africa. Multiple tales will be shared, as well as Cherokee traditions and more.

This program is free and open to the public. For more information, call 505-891-5018.

Silver City Museum

Silver City Museum

Fifty Years Ago in Silver City Community Panel Discussion

21 Sep 2017

Cindy Medrano’s Master’s thesis is on the discrimination that Hispanics have experienced in the mining communities and other areas of Grant County. She will moderate a panel with community members Elena Cisneros, Maria Dominguez and Gilbert and Maria Garcia, all of whom experienced the impact of segregation. The panelists will all speak of their personal experiences of discrimination as Hispanics in the Grant County area and the legacy of those experiences. Segregation in mining towns, schools and downtown Silver City eased in the 1960s. By the time of the Silver City Museum’s founding, official school segregation had ended but not its legacy. For more information, call (757)388-1096.

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WE THE PEOPLE...Constitution Day is September 18!

19 Sep 2017

Constitution Day commemorates the signing of the U. S. Constitution on September 17, 1787.  The legal document on which this country was founded over 200 years ago has served as a model for other countries around the world and continues to be vital to this nation's guiding principles.

Test your U.S. Constitution knowledge HERE.  

VanAnn Moore as Doña Tules

VanAnn Moore as Doña Tules

Amazing Women of the Wild West: Territorial New Mexico

15 Sep 2017

One of the most dramatic eras of New Mexico’s rich history is the Territorial period when the United States first raised the American flag on August 18, 1846 over the plaza of Santa Fe. VanAnn Moore examines the territorial women through living history portrayals of Doña Tules (Gertrudes Barcelo), Susan Shelby Magoffin, and Lydia Spencer Lane. These women represented what it took to survive and thrive during very colorful and extremely challenging times in New Mexico’s Territorial Era. 

This program is free and open to the public. For more information, call 505-334-9325.

Sunny Dooley

Sunny Dooley

Diné Blessingway Stories with Sunny Dooley

13 Sep 2017

Sunny Dooley tells Diné (Navajo) Blessingway stories with the blessing of her family, clans, and elders.This talk focuses on cultural items significant in maintaining Diné matrilineal teachings. They include the Navajo basket; the woman's traditional dress of moccasins, leggings, dress with sash belt, hair tie and hair brush; goat skins, grinding stones, rock brushes, clay pot, and so on. This program is free and open to the public. For more information, call (505)321-0034.

Dr. Cipriano Vigil

Dr. Cipriano Vigil

Northern New Mexico Ritual Music with Cipriano Vigil

11 Sep 2017

Cipriano Vigil, a native of Chamisal in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, is the living embodiment of nuevo mexicano ritual music. As a boy, he learned from the previous generations of musicians at bailes (dances) and at entriegas, matrimonios y difuntos (christenings, marriages and funerals.) He takes you back to the encircling institutions where these village rituals bound families and neighbors together in responsibility for each other. His songs in the nueva cancion tradition (related to U.S. protest and labor songs) address poignant issues of today. 

This is a free, public program.

Dr. Steve Cormier

Dr. Steve Cormier

Cowboy Music with Steve Cormier

9 Sep 2017

Cowboy music has evolved from the open range and ranch employees who worked and rode after cattle during the late 19th and early to mid 20th century. These include songs written by ranch hands about horses, cattle and lost love. Others add death and the devil to the story. But all have in common the expression of what ranch and farm work was like during this time. Steve Cormier performs these and also songs he has written, reflecting his years as a ranch and farm hand.

This is a free, public program.

VanAnn Moore as Sarah Bernhardt and Lillian Russell

VanAnn Moore as Sarah Bernhardt and Lillian Russell

VanAnn Moore brings to life entertainers of the old West

9 Sep 2017

Everyone likes to be entertained, and early days in the old West was no exception! Early theatrical troupes featuring the actresses and singers of the day were always a welcome sight, especially in the mining towns and other places "out-in-the-sticks." Some of the earliest stars who braved the rugged traveling conditions in a stage coach or wagon over mountainous roads and high desert trails were Lillie Langtree, Sarah Bernhardt, Lillian Russell, Lotta Crabtree, and the famous Lola Montez. Primitive conditions often greeted these talented women, and sometimes their audiences wore their six-shooters right into the theatres. In New Mexico there were numerous old Opera Houses in Cerrillos, Raton, Albuquerque, and Socorro. But anywhere a tent or school, saloon or stable could create a "make-shift place," you could have your entertainment. These famous women performers traveled everywhere to give their audiences excitement, diversion and charm that can only be re-imagined in this enticing performance by VanAnn Moore.

This free, public program takes place at the Hubbard Museum of the American West. For more information, call (575)378-4142.

Stories to Bridge Cultures

8 Sep 2017

Mary Ellen Gonzales is half Hispanic and half Anglo, making her a "culture bridger." She tells Hispanic stories and puts them into cultural and historical context. She also tells ghost and creation stories from many cultures. She challenges audiences of all ages to think about why things happen the way they do and how they feel about it. 

This free, public program takes place at the Las Posada Hotel. For more information, call (505)982-3997.

Voss & Osborne

Voss & Osborne

1912: A Musical Snapshot of America in the Year New Mexico Became a State

12 Aug 2017

New Mexico achieved statehood in 1912 during a fascinating and complex time in America's history. The frontier was no longer open for expansion. The U.S. was becoming a major power in the world. New technologies like electric power, telephones, film, recordings, radio, automobiles, and airplanes were changing life in America. Minorities, women, and workers were all agitating for more rights. Voss & Osborne present songs that are documents of American life and tell a lot about what ordinary people of the time found interesting, and how they felt about these developments. 

This program is free and open to the public. For more information, call (575)378-4142.

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Nanao Sakaki

Nanao Sakaki

My Journey with Poet Nanao Sakaki

12 Aug 2017

John Brandi shares the history of his friendship with Japanese poet Nanao Sakaki. Good friends with Gary Snyder and Allen Ginsberg, Sakaki was encouraged by them to travel to the US, and in 1971 he was drawn to northern New Mexico where he ended up living in a school bus below Taos Mountain. Sakaki’s poetry is marked by humor and appreciation for a simple lifestyle, the embodiment of unconventional wisdom and spirited non-conformism. Brandi, founder of Tooth of Time Books, published Sakaki’s first major collection poetry, "Real Play" and will speak about Sakaki’s poetry and role as a countercultural literary icon. 

Join the New Mexico History Museum every second Saturday of the month from June-February for a presentation and conversation-style gallery talk in conjunction with the current exhibit, Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest.

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Chuy Martinez

Chuy Martinez

An American Dialogue: Latin American Ballads, Cumbia and Nueva Cancion

12 Aug 2017

For decades, a rich conversation has been exchanging musical ideas between the Americas: the ballad, from Spain and Mexico; the cumbia, of Caribbean African/Indian roots; and nueva cancion (new song), social struggle music influenced by U.S. labor and protest songs. Mr. Chuy Martinez puts the songs and rhythms in historical context.

This program is free and open to the public. For more information, call (575)854-2361.

POP CULTURE: 50 Years Ago in Silver City Community Panel

10 Aug 2017

Pop Culture community panel will discuss the popular diversions locals enjoyed in Silver City and Grant County circa 1967. Panelists Patricia Cano, Patsy Madrid and Cruz Bustillo will lead the conversation in remembrances of the cars, music, local sports teams and youth culture of the late 1960s.

This program is part of the 50 Years Ago in Silver City exhibit community panel series.

For more information, call (575)388-1096.

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Lesley Poling-Kempes

Lesley Poling-Kempes

Lesley Poling-Kempes, Award-Winning Author, Presents 

Ladies of the Canyons

5 Aug 2017

Ladies of the Canyons is a lecture/slide show about remarkable women who left the security and comforts of genteel Victorian society and journeyed to the American Southwest in search of a wider view of themselves and their world.

Lesley Poling-Kempes is the award winning author of six books of fiction and nonfiction about the American Southwest. Her newest book “Ladies of the Canyons: A League of Extraordinary Women & Their Adventures in the American Southwest” won the 2015 Reading the West Book Award for nonfiction from the MPIBA, a Silver Medal in US History from the 2016 IPPY Awards, and is a WWA Spur Award finalist in historic nonfiction.  

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Camilla Dodson

Camilla Dodson

Take the Kids! A Friendly World with South African Native, Camilla Dodson

27 Jul 2017

JULY 27 * 12:00 PM

Despite cultural, racial, or religious differences, all people are equally valuable. Camilla Dodson, a South African native and former resident of Ireland, offers children a fun, non-preachy lesson in this fundamental principle of a civilized society. The program includes poetry, music, and dance based on themes of equality of persons. 

This free, public program takes place at Magdalena Public library. For more information, call 575-854-2361.

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